CBD Hemp Oil Congestive Heart Failure

Marijuana use and heart-attack risk were correlated in a large human study, Stanford scientists and their collaborators found. A molecule in soybeans may counteract these effects. CBD has been shown to slow down the progression of many conditions that lead to heart failure. Let’s find out how it works and how to use it effectively. SEATTLE, Feb. 20, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — via NEWMEDIAWIRE — CFN Media Group (“CFN Media”), the leading agency and financial media network dedicated to…

Marijuana linked to heart disease; supplement may mitigate risk, study reports

Marijuana use and heart-attack risk were correlated in a large human study, Stanford scientists and their collaborators found. A molecule in soybeans may counteract these effects.

April 29, 2022 – By Krista Conger

People who smoke marijuana more than once a month have an increased risk of heart attack and heart disease, Stanford researchers and their colleagues have found.
Dmytro Tyshchenko/Shutterstock.com

People who use marijuana have an increased risk of heart disease and heart attack, according to a large study led by researchers at Stanford Medicine.

The study also showed that the psychoactive component of the drug, known as THC, causes inflammation in endothelial cells that line the interior of blood vessels, as well as atherosclerosis in laboratory mice.

The inflammation and atherosclerosis can be blocked by a small molecule called genistein that occurs naturally in soy and fava beans, the researchers found. Because genistein has limited brain penetration, it doesn’t inhibit THC’s ability to stimulate appetite, dull pain and tamp down nausea — characteristics vital to medicinal marijuana users.

“As more states legalize the recreational use of marijuana, users need to be aware that it could have cardiovascular side effects,” said Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, professor of cardiovascular medicine and of radiology, and the director of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. “But genistein works quite well to mitigate marijuana-induced damage of the endothelial vessels without blocking the effects marijuana has on the central nervous system, and it could be a way for medical marijuana users to protect themselves from a cardiovascular standpoint.”

In part because THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, is a controlled substance in the United States and therefore strictly regulated in medical research, the investigators cautioned that the long-term health effects of regular use remain largely unclear.

“Marijuana has a significantly adverse effect on the cardiovascular system,” said instructor of medicine Mark Chandy, MD, PhD. “As more states legalize marijuana use, I expect we will begin to see a rise in heart attacks and strokes in the coming years. Our studies of human cells and mice clearly outline how THC exposure initiates a damaging molecular cascade in the blood vessels. It’s not a benign drug.”

Wu, who holds the Simon H. Stertzer, MD, Professorship, is the senior author of the study, which will be published online April 29 in Cell. Chandy shares lead authorship with former postdoctoral scholar Tzu-Tang Wei, PhD, and instructor Masataka Nishiga, MD.

THC and inflammation

The researchers analyzed the genetic and medical data of about 500,000 people ages 40-69. The data was from the UK Biobank. Nearly 35,000 participants reported smoking cannabis; of those, about 11,000 smoked more than once a month. The more-than-monthly smokers were significantly more likely than others in the study to have a heart attack after controlling for other factors including age, body mass index and sex. The researchers found that frequent marijuana smokers were also more likely than nonusers to have their first heart attack before the age of 50 — an unusual medical event called a premature heart attack that increases a person’s lifelong risk of subsequent heart attack, heart failure and life-threatening arrhythmias that can cause sudden death.

Inflammation of the blood vessels is a primary hallmark of atherosclerosis — the thickening of the vessel wall due to the buildup of plaques made up of fats, cholesterol and other substances — which can lead to heart attack. The researchers found that the levels of inflammatory molecules in the blood of volunteers who smoked a marijuana cigarette increased significantly over the subsequent three hours. They further showed that THC promotes inflammation and hallmarks of atherosclerosis in human endothelial cells grown in the laboratory. Finally, laboratory mice bred to have high cholesterol levels and fed a high-fat diet developed significantly larger atherosclerosis plaques when injected with THC at levels comparable to smoking one marijuana cigarette per day than did control animals.

THC binds to a receptor called CB1 on cells in the human brain, heart and vasculature system. The receptor recognizes naturally occurring cannabinoids, or endocannabinoids, which regulate mood, pain perception, immune function and metabolism. But frequent marijuana use causes inappropriate activation of CB1, which can cause inflammation and atherosclerosis, and it is associated with obesity, cancer and diabetes. Researchers have been trying to develop molecules called antagonists to block CB1’s function in conditions in which the receptor is overactive, like obesity, but until now the use of the antagonists has been thwarted by psychiatric side effects including mood disorders and anxiety arising from their activity in the brain.

Search for CB1 antagonists

The researchers used machine-learning techniques to screen a large database of protein structures and identify molecules structurally similar to previously identified CB1 antagonists that could block THC’s inflammatory and atherosclerotic properties without causing psychiatric side effects. They found that genistein, a naturally occurring molecule in soybeans, binds to CB1 but has poor brain penetration. When they added the genistein molecule to THC-treated human endothelial cells or gave it to the THC-injected mice with high cholesterol, they found genistein blocked the drug’s deleterious effects and did not block the psychoactive effects of THC on the brain.

As more states legalize the recreational use of marijuana, users need to be aware that it could have cardiovascular side effects.

“We didn’t see any blocking of the normal painkilling or sedating effects of THC in the mice that contribute to marijuana’s potentially useful medicinal properties,” Chandy said. “So genistein is potentially a safer drug than previous CB1 antagonists. It is already used as a nutritional supplement, and 99% of it stays outside the brain, so it shouldn’t cause these particular adverse side effects.”

The researchers hope to conduct clinical trials to learn whether genistein can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in marijuana users. They’d also like to extend their studies to include CBD — another cannabinoid in marijuana that does not have the psychoactive effects of THC.

“There’s a growing public perception that marijuana is harmless or even beneficial,” Wu said, comparing the legalization of marijuana use to vaping, which was first marketed as a safe way to stop smoking but has since been shown to cause lung damage and lead to increased tobacco use. “Marijuana clearly has important medicinal uses, but recreational users should think carefully about excessive use.”

Other Stanford authors of the study are graduate student Angela Zhang; postdoctoral scholars Kaavya Krishna Kumar, PhD, Dilip Thomas, PhD, Amit Manhas, PhD, and Johanne Marie Justesen, PhD; instructors of cardiovascular medicine Siyeon Rhee, PhD, and Chun Liu, PhD; cardiovascular fellow Ian Chen, MD, PhD; former postdoctoral scholars Saereh Khanamiri, PhD, and Hung-Ta Wo, MD; life sciences researcher Johnson Yang, former graduate student Frederick Seidl, PhD; Noah Burns, PhD, associate professor of chemistry; Nazish Sayed, MD, PhD, assistant professor of vascular surgery; Manuel Rivas, PhD, assistant professor of biomedical data science; and Brian Kobilka, PhD, professor of molecular and cellular physiology.

Researchers from National Taiwan University, the University of Copenhagen, Academia Sinica, the University of Colorado School of Medicine and UC-San Francisco also contributed to the work.

The research was supported by the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, the American Heart Association, the Steven M. Gootter Foundation, the Taiwan Ministry of Science and Technology, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, the Leducq Foundation, and the Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program.

CBD and Congestive Heart Failure: Can It Help?

In the United States, around 655,000 people die each year from heart failure.

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That’s a lot of people.

As with most things, prevention is better than a cure. CBD isn’t the cure for congestive heart failure, but studies suggest it may help prevent it.

So, how can CBD help, and what’s the best type of CBD for preventing congestive heart failure (CHF)?

Can CBD Prevent Congestive Heart Failure?

Congestive heart failure happens after many years of blocked arteries, high blood pressure, or damaged chambers. This can be caused by a number of different health issues, the main of which are listed above.

CBD can help prevent congestive heart failure by treating a number of the conditions raised earlier. If these conditions can be controlled, the risk of heart failure can be decreased.

It’s not 100% clear if CBD will help prevent heart failure completely. However, several benefits may help in conjunction with lifestyle changes, and in some cases, other medications.

It’s important to note that CBD may interact with prescription and over-the-counter medications, so you should always consult your doctor before using CBD to treat a condition that could lead to congestive heart failure.

If you’re suffering from obesity, diabetes, heart disease, or high blood pressure, CBD may help reduce symptoms and even aid in getting better. This could be a huge factor in reducing the chances of heart failure.

What is Congestive Heart Failure?

Congestive heart failure, also known simply as heart failure, occurs when the heart cannot pump enough blood around the body.

Certain conditions and diseases can leave the heart too weak or stiff to pump blood effectively. This will eventually lead to a heart attack.

The Symptoms of Congestive Heart Failure

There are a number of early warning signs for heart failure. Below are some of the more common symptoms leading up to CHF:

  • Extreme fatigue & weakness
  • Rapid or irregular heartbeat
  • Shortness of breath
  • Difficulty exercising
  • Persistent cough with bloody phlegm
  • Abnormal weight gain from fluid retention
  • Reduced appetite & nausea when eating
  • Brain fog and difficulty concentrating
  • Edema (swelling in the legs, ankles, and feet)
  • Chest pains

It’s important to note that these symptoms do match up with other conditions and are considered normal in some circumstances.

Don’t overthink if you’re experiencing one or two of these symptoms mildly, but make sure to check with your doctor if you’re concerned about your heart health. It’s better to be safe than sorry.

What Causes Congestive Heart Failure?

There are several conditions that can eventually lead to heart failure.

Some of these conditions are incurable but the risk of heart failure can be decreased. Some other conditions that can potentially lead to heart failure are curable and can be defeated with a few simple lifestyle changes.

Below are some of the more common conditions that are associated with heart failure.

1. Heart Disease

Heart disease is a broad term that categorizes a number of preventable and unpreventable heart conditions.

Some types, such as congenital heart defect, are genetic defects of the heart that are present for life. This can include abnormal heart valves, septal defects (holes in the heart’s chambers), and atresia (a missing heart valve).

Coronary artery disease is the most common type of heart disease. The arteries that supply blood to the heart can become clogged with plaque, causing them to narrow and reduce the efficiency of the heart.

In some people, coronary artery disease is preventable and curable with some lifestyle changes. For others, it’s something that must be treated for life.

Arrhythmia is when a person has an irregular heartbeat. When the electrical impulses that coordinate the muscle’s pumping function don’t work properly, the heartbeat can become irregular or pump too fast or slow.

Dilated cardiomyopathy is where the heart’s chambers become dilated. With dilated chambers, the heart becomes weaker and struggles to pump blood properly. This type of heart disease usually comes prior to heart attacks and arrhythmia.

If left untreated, heart disease can lead to heart attack and heart failure.

2. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, is where your blood pressure is higher than normal.

High blood pressure strains the heart and other organs. When you have hypertension, your heart works overtime to pump blood around your body.

The higher your blood pressure, the more risk you face for other conditions and health issues. Left untreated, high blood pressure can lead to heart disease, stroke, or a heart attack.

3. Diabetes

Put simply, diabetes affects how your body processes food into energy. It’s a chronic health condition that can be treated and controlled but has no cure.

When you eat a meal, most of the food is broken down into glucose (sugar) that is then released into the bloodstream. When blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas releases insulin to help the body use the glucose as energy.

Diabetes sufferers either don’t produce enough insulin (if any at all) or can’t utilize the insulin in the same way as a normally functioning body.

When the body has a lack of insulin or the insulin present isn’t functioning as it should, glucose can build up in the bloodstream. Over time, the excess glucose, if left untreated, can cause serious health issues including eventual heart failure.

4. Obesity

Over 40% of the U.S population is considered obese. It comes primarily from over-eating. Obesity is mostly preventable and if you’re suffering from obesity, with the right lifestyle changes, you can combat it.

You’re considered obese when your BMI is over 30.

Subcutaneous fat is visible fat. It forms under the skin all over the body with the most common areas affected consist of the hips, buttocks, and abdominal region.

Visceral body fat (also known as hidden fat) is much more dangerous. It’s stored deep inside the belly and around the organs. It’s this fat that causes the most health implications.

Obesity puts a strain on all of your organs and the excess fat around your heart can lead to serious health issues.

Obesity can lead to heart disease, and eventually, heart attack and heart failure.

What are the Benefits of CBD for Congestive Heart Failure?

So, what are the potential benefits of CBD for congestive heart failure?

As mentioned, CBD alone isn’t going to prevent heart failure, but it can be used to treat some conditions that could lead to it.

1. CBD May Regulate Blood Sugar Levels

There is evidence that suggests some cannabinoids, including CBD, can help regulate blood sugar levels and help resolve diabetic complications [1].

Although the cannabinoid THC seems to regulate blood sugar more effectively than CBD, full-spectrum oil may have the same desired effect.

Lowering blood sugar levels will help reduce the damage caused by diabetes. This could be what prevents congestive heart failure in a diabetic patient.

2. CBD Helps to Fight Obesity

CBD can aid in weight loss.

Some studies suggest that supplementing a weight loss routine with CBD can help shed excess pounds [2]. CBD promotes the browning of white fats, which makes it easier to convert the fat into burnable calories.

Obesity is one of the leading causes of congestive heart failure. If you’re obese, losing weight is essential in enhancing your health and reducing the risk of many health complications — including congestive heart failure.

3. CBD Decreases Inflammation

CBD is renowned for its anti-inflammatory benefits. This desirable trait could help prevent heart failure in the long term.

Diabetes and heart disease can cause damage to the walls of the blood vessels. This damage can cause inflammation. One study found that glucose-triggered inflammation can be relieved by CBD [3].

Inflamed blood vessels make it harder for the heart to pump blood around the body. Reducing this inflammation will help ease the strain on the heart, ultimately preventing further damage and potential heart failure.

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4. CBD Lowers Blood Pressure

CBD lowers blood pressure.

Studies suggest that even low doses of CBD can significantly lower blood pressure [4].

High blood pressure (hypertension) has been directly linked to congestive heart failure. Reducing blood pressure and keeping it down consistently will help prevent congestive heart failure in the long term.

How to Use CBD For Congestive Heart Failure?

Using CBD to lose weight, control blood sugar levels, lower blood pressure, or decrease inflammation may help prevent congestive heart failure.

How you use CBD for congestive heart failure will affect the results you get. Choosing the right CBD product is vital to reaping the rewards that this cannabinoid sows.

It’s important to note that you shouldn’t use CBD alone to treat certain health conditions. A combination of lifestyle changes and other medications may be needed to get on top of some conditions.

1. Full-Spectrum, Broad-Spectrum, or Isolate?

You may have heard the terms isolate, broad-spectrum, and full-spectrum, but what’s the difference? And which is best for congestive heart failure?

CBD Isolate

CBD isolate is a pure extract of the cannabinoid CBD (cannabidiol). Oils, edibles, and topicals that are made using isolate contain only CBD with no other cannabinoids or terpenes present.

CBD isolates are great if you want to avoid THC or any other cannabinoids entirely. They’re perfect for people that react badly to other cannabinoids and they have no chance of showing up on a drug test.

The only downside is you won’t get the full entourage effect as you would with a full-spectrum product. Research suggests that CBD is more effective when consumed as part of a full cannabinoid profile [5].

Broad-Spectrum

Broad-spectrum products contain CBD as well as a wide range of other cannabinoids.

Broad-spectrum oils, edibles, and topicals contain a cannabinoid profile similar to what’s in the raw hemp flower. The only cannabinoid that broad-spectrum products don’t contain is the psychoactive cannabinoid THC.

Broad-spectrum CBD is perfect for people that want to reap the benefits of the entourage effect without consuming THC. Broad-spectrum products have no chance of showing up on drug tests.

Full-Spectrum

Full-spectrum CBD products contain a full cannabinoid profile. They have an identical profile to the raw hemp flower including THC in percentages lower than 0.3%.

This type of CBD is the most valuable to use for multiple health conditions and holds the most potential for preventing congestive heart failure. This is because it provides the full entourage effect.

Full-spectrum oils and edibles have THC levels that are too low to provide a “high”, but depending on how much you’re consuming, they may show up on drug tests.

2. CBD Consumption Method

There are many ways to consume CBD. Some are better than others for treating conditions that are associated with congestive heart failure. It’s important to know which products are best.

You will find all of these CBD products in isolate, broad-spectrum, and full-spectrum options.

CBD Oil

CBD oil provides you with the most flexibility in terms of dosage. It’s also one of the best ways to consume CBD for heart failure because it’s highly bioavailable and has few additives that will trigger any undesirable effects.

You can add drops directly under the tongue or supplement meals and drinks by adding a few drops into your meal routine.

CBD Edibles

CBD edibles come in many forms. You’ll find CBD-infused honey sticks, gummies, lollipops, and more.

Edibles are fantastic if you can’t stand the taste of raw CBD oil. However, they’re not ideal for treating some conditions related to congestive heart failure.

Because of the high sugar content, you should avoid CBD edibles if you have diabetes or are struggling with obesity.

CBD Capsules

Technically edible, capsules give you a tasteless way to consume CBD without the sugar found in chewable edibles.

Capsules provide you with an accurate dosage per capsule and medicating is as easy as swallowing a pill.

CBD capsules are a great option for congestive heart failure because they contain no sugar and are relatively bioavailable.

CBD Topicals

Topicals are CBD products such as gels, creams, and balms that can be applied directly to the skin.

Although they’re great if you’re suffering from a skin condition, they pose no real value for conditions that are related to heart failure.

CBD Vaporizers

CBD vape liquid is heated up and inhaled as a vapor. Using CBD in this way provides maximum bioavailability as it absorbs lung tissue quickly and efficiently.

Unfortunately, there’s little known about the negative effects of vaping CBD, so if you’re suffering from a severe health condition it isn’t the first consumption method you should look at.

3. CBD Dosage for Heart Failure

CBD works differently from person to person.

The right dosage for one person won’t be correct for another, so there is some level of self-experimentation needed to find out what’s right for you.

Generally speaking, a dose between 20 and 100-milligrams per day will be effective for most conditions but it could be significantly higher or lower depending on your body weight, metabolism, and age.

As with most supplements, you should start with a low dose and work your way up until you find out what’s effective for you.

If you’ve never used CBD before it’s especially important that you test the waters with a low potency product at a low dose to find out how your body reacts to the cannabinoid.

Once you’re sure there are no negative effects, you can increase the dosage slowly until you get the desired effects.

Make sure you consult your doctor before using CBD to supplement other medications for your condition.

Final Thoughts: Can CBD Help Prevent Congestive Heart Failure?

In short, yes CBD can help prevent congestive heart failure.

CBD can help with weight loss, diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure. Controlling these conditions may reduce the chances of heart failure.

If you’re looking at CBD as a treatment for congestive heart failure it’s important to first speak with your doctor. CBD may negatively impact other medications and treatments, so it’s of paramount importance you seek professional advice.

When looking for the best CBD product for your condition, we advise you to research the brand and check the independent lab reports. This way, you’ll be certain you’re receiving the best possible treatment.

References Used In This Article

  1. Horváth, B., Mukhopadhyay, P., Haskó, G., & Pacher, P. (2012). The endocannabinoid system and plant-derived cannabinoids in diabetes and diabetic complications. The American journal of pathology, 180(2), 432-442.
  2. Parray, H. A., & Yun, J. W. (2016). Cannabidiol promotes browning in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Molecular and cellular biochemistry, 416(1), 131-139.
  3. Rajesh, M., Mukhopadhyay, P., Bátkai, S., Hasko, G., Liaudet, L., Drel, V. R., … & Pacher, P. (2007). Cannabidiol attenuates high glucose-induced endothelial cell inflammatory response and barrier disruption. American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology, 293(1), H610-H619.
  4. Jadoon, K. A., Tan, G. D., & O’Sullivan, S. E. (2017). A single dose of cannabidiol reduces blood pressure in healthy volunteers in a randomized crossover study. JCI insight, 2(12).
  5. Russo, E. B. (2019). The case for the entourage effect and conventional breeding of clinical cannabis: no “strain,” no gain. Frontiers in plant science, 9, 1969.
Nina Julia

Nina created CFAH.org following the birth of her second child. She was a science and math teacher for 6 years prior to becoming a parent — teaching in schools in White Plains, New York and later in Paterson, New Jersey.

Heart Failure and CBD — CFN Media

SEATTLE, Feb. 20, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — via NEWMEDIAWIRE — CFN Media Group (“CFN Media”), the leading agency and financial media network dedicated to the North American cannabis industry, announces publication of an article covering Cardiol Therapeutics (TSX: CRDL) (OTC: CRTPF) and its development of cannabidiol (CBD) based drugs for the treatment of heart failure.

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Heart failure (HF) affects more than 6 million adults in Canada and the United States and is a leading cause of hospitalization, with costs exceeding $30 billion each year in the US alone. People with HF suffer from shortness of breath, rapid heart rate, edema, reduced exercise capacity, often struggle with simple daily activities, and are frequently hospitalized. For many, these symptoms significantly reduce quality of life.

There are two main types of HF: heart failure with poor contraction or reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), also known as systolic heart failure, and heart failure with poor relaxation or preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), also known as diastolic heart failure. About half of HF patients suffer from HFpEF. Unfortunately, treatment for HFpEF has not advanced over the last couple of decades, with the standard of care currently involving the use of diuretics such as Lasix to relieve swelling of the tissue by removing water and salt. Diuretics do improve symptoms but there is a lack of data indicating that diuretics are actually effective in the treatment of the causes of HF.

There is, however, considerable research indicating that cannabidiol, or CBD, has potent anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties that could prove beneficial for treating HFpEF. Derived from the hemp or cannabis plant, CBD is getting a lot of attention as researchers are finally able to legally study the molecule. One issue with CBD lies with its delivery, due to CBD’s hydrophobic nature. If taken orally, the liver removes much of the CBD before it enters the bloodstream, with the result that most current treatments involve very high and imprecise dosing.

Cardiol Therapeutics is a biotech company with a strong background in heart therapy research, a proven and patented nanotechnology solution for the targeted delivery of CBD and other lipophilic drugs to inflamed tissues, and a supplier of ultra-pure pharmaceutical CBD to further its research into the treatment of HFpEF. Cardiol is also advancing an immunotherapeutic for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the deadly brain cancer that took the lives of Senators Ted Kennedy and John McCain. The company believes a combination of cannabinoids and cell-based immunotherapies shows great promise in the treatment of GBM. Cardiol will soon be launching its ultra-pure pharmaceutical CBD oil into the Canadian medical market, a move the company hopes will generate significant revenue in the short term.

Nanotechnology Enables Targeted CBD Delivery

Cardiol has developed a unique patented system whereby lipophilic (fat soluble) drugs like CBD, are encased in a hydrophilic (water soluble) shell. This shell allows the active lipophilic ingredient to effectively circulate in the bloodstream. Normally, taking CBD orally results in less than 10% bioavailability, due to “first-pass” metabolism by the liver. Cardiol’s nanotherapeutics delivery methodology, which avoids the oral route, allows for much higher levels of lipophilic active ingredients in the bloodstream and, most importantly, has the potential to deliver drugs to specific sites of inflammation in the body. This proprietary technology could be licensed or partnered with other companies. Furthermore, the opportunity here is not just limited to CBD delivery, as these same problems have vexed companies developing other lipophilic drugs.

By utilizing this nanotechnology delivery system, Cardiol has found in an experimental model that its nanoparticles preferentially accumulate in inflamed heart tissue. These findings validate the platform’s targeted delivery and point the way to further research through a clinical trial program.

Cardiol is collaborating with researchers and opinion leaders at international centers of excellence to leverage multidisciplinary expertise in drug delivery, drug formulation, nanotherapeutics, cardiac physiology, and heart failure to advance its clinical programs. The company’s nanotechnology is developed in conjunction with the National Institute for Nanotechnology, a joint venture of the University of Alberta, the National Research Council of Canada, and the Government of Alberta.

The company is also collaborating with the DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center in Houston, one of the leading heart hospitals in the United States, to investigate its nanotechnology as it relates directly to treatment of heart failure.

The company has partnered with TecSalud del Tecnológico de Monterrey (“TecSalud”) in Mexico in a US$3 million R&D program. TecSalud has collaborative relationships with the DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for its nanotechnology programs.

Overall, Cardiol is collaborating with some of the world’s best heart and nanotech research organizations to develop its diverse product pipeline.

Experienced Team

Cardiol’s President and CEO, David Elsley, previously founded Vasogen Inc. in the 1990’s. Vasogen was a biotech focused on treating heart conditions and inflammatory disease, and under Mr. Elsley’s watch it went public on the NASDAQ and the TSX, reaching a market capitalization north of US$1 billion. His experience in founding and growing a company from start-up through clinical trials is essential as he guides Cardiol Therapeutics through a similar growth process.

He is joined by many other proven industry leaders, including the company’s Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Eldon Smith. Dr. Smith is the former Head of Cardiology and Dean of Medicine at the University of Calgary. He also spent 14 years as Editor-in-Chief of the Canadian Journal of Cardiology. Dr. Smith has served on a wide variety of medical societies and associations, both in the private and public sector. He also brings a wealth of public company experience to Cardiol, having served as Director of more than ten public companies.

Collectively, Cardiol’s executive team has extensive scientific, regulatory, and public company experience. This leadership is essential to the company’s development and potential for success, as it navigates the complexities of bringing HF drug candidates through the clinical trial process to potential commercialization.

2019 a Pivotal Year for Cardiol

After going public with an IPO on the Toronto Stock Exchange on December 20, 2018, Cardiol Therapeutics is looking forward to an eventful 2019. The company is introducing ultra-pure pharmaceutical CBD to a Canadian medical market that is currently experiencing a major supply shortfall following the full legalization of cannabis. Cardiol views this as a significant revenue opportunity, and it serves as a major differentiator when compared to other biotech companies exclusively involved in clinical research. In lockstep, Cardiol expects to advance its product pipeline, specifically, its CBD-based HF treatment.

There is great upside potential for Cardiol as the company advances its therapies for the treatment of HF. Concurrently, the company is advancing its immunotherapeutic for the treatment of GBM, the most frequent and deadliest form of cancer affecting the brain. Treatments in the US for GBM are eligible for orphan drug status, meaning clinical research is subject to Fast Track review, with the intent of getting successful treatments to market as quickly as possible.

There are several potential milestones and catalysts for CRDL over the coming months. Combining the proven value creation of biotech drug development with the explosive potential of cannabinoid-based therapies, while targeting an enormous heart failure market, Cardiol Therapeutics is well positioned for significant growth.

Please follow the link to read the full article: https://www.cannabisfn.com/heart-failure-and-cbd/

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