CBD Oil Schedule 1

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With the issuance of this final order, the Acting Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration places certain drug products that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and which contain cannabidiol (CBD) in schedule V of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA)…. For something to be a controlled substance under the federal Controlled Substances Act (CSA), it must be specifically scheduled and assigned one of five scheduling criteria. The DEA recently rescheduled certain CBD products from Schedule 1 to Schedule 5, but cannabis is still considered Schedule 1. Find out if you can now legally purchase CBD in your state.

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Schedules of Controlled Substances: Placement in Schedule V of Certain FDA-Approved Drugs Containing Cannabidiol; Corresponding Change to Permit Requirements

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Printed version: PDF Publication Date: 09/28/2018 Agencies: Drug Enforcement Administration Dates: Effective September 28, 2018. Effective Date: 09/28/2018 Document Type: Rule Document Citation: 83 FR 48950 Page: 48950-48953 (4 pages) CFR: 21 CFR 1308 21 CFR 1312 Agency/Docket Number: Docket No. DEA-486 Document Number: 2018-21121

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AGENCY:

Drug Enforcement Administration, Department of Justice.

ACTION:

SUMMARY:

With the issuance of this final order, the Acting Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration places certain drug products that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and which contain cannabidiol (CBD) in schedule V of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). Specifically, this order places FDA-approved drugs that contain CBD derived from cannabis and no more than 0.1 percent tetrahydrocannabinols in schedule V. This action is required to satisfy the responsibility of the Acting Administrator under the CSA to place a drug in the schedule he deems most appropriate to carry out United States obligations under the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, 1961. Also consistent therewith, DEA is adding such drugs to the list of substances that may only be imported or exported pursuant to a permit.

DATES:

Effective September 28, 2018.

Start Further Info

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

Kathy L. Federico, Regulatory Drafting and Policy Support Section (DPW), Diversion Control Division, Drug Enforcement Administration; Mailing Address: 8701 Morrissette Drive, Springfield, Virginia 22152; Telephone: (202) 598-6812.

End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background and Legal Authority

The United States is a party to the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, 1961 (Single Convention), and other international conventions designed to establish effective control over international and domestic traffic in controlled substances. 21 U.S.C. 801(7). The Single Convention entered into force for the United States on June 24, 1967, after the Senate gave its advice and consent to the United States’ accession. See Single Convention, 18 U.S.T. 1407. The enactment and enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) are the primary means by which the United States carries out its obligations under the Single Convention. [1] Various provisions of the CSA directly reference the Single Convention. One such provision is 21 U.S.C. 811(d)(1), which relates to scheduling of controlled substances.

As stated in subsection 811(d)(1), if control of a substance is required “by United States obligations under international treaties, conventions, or protocols in effect on October 27, 1970, the Attorney General shall issue an order controlling such drug under the schedule he deems most appropriate to carry out such obligations, without regard to the findings required by [subsections 811(a) or 812(b)] and without regard to the procedures prescribed by [subsections 811(a) and (b)].” This provision is consistent with the Supremacy Clause of the U.S. Constitution (art. VI, sec. 2), which provides that all treaties made under the authority of the United States “shall be the supreme Law of the Land.” In accordance with this constitutional Start Printed Page 48951 mandate, under section 811(d)(1), Congress directed the Attorney General (and the Administrator of DEA, by delegation) [2] to ensure that compliance by the United States with our nation’s obligations under the Single Convention is given top consideration when it comes to scheduling determinations.

Section 811(d)(1) is relevant here because, on June 25, 2018, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that it approved a drug that is subject to control under the Single Convention. Specifically, the FDA announced that it approved the drug Epidiolex for the treatment of seizures associated with two rare and severe forms of epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome, in patients two years of age and older. www.fda.gov/​NewsEvents/​Newsroom/​PressAnnouncements/​ucm611046.htm. Epidiolex is an oral solution that contains cannabidiol (CBD) extracted from the cannabis plant. This is the first FDA-approved drug made from the cannabis plant. [3] Now that Epiodiolex has been approved by the FDA, it has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States for purposes of the CSA. Accordingly, Epidiolex no longer meets the criteria for placement in schedule I of the CSA. See 21 U.S.C. 812(b) (indicating that while substances in schedule I have no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States, substances in schedules II-V do); see also United States v. Oakland Cannabis Buyers’ Cooperative, 532 U.S. 483, 491-92 (2001) (same). DEA must therefore take the appropriate scheduling action to remove the drug from schedule I.

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In making this scheduling determination, as section 811(d)(1) indicates, it is necessary to assess the relevant requirements of the Single Convention. Under the treaty, cannabis, cannabis resin, and extracts and tinctures of cannabis are listed in Schedule I. [4] The cannabis plant contains more than 100 cannabinoids. Among these are tetrahydrocannabinols (THC) and CBD. [5] Material that contains THC and CBD extracted from the cannabis plant falls within the listing of extracts and tinctures of cannabis for purposes of the Single Convention. [6] Thus, such material, which includes, among other things, a drug product containing CBD extracted from the cannabis plant, is a Schedule I drug under the Single Convention.

Parties to the Single Convention are required to impose a number of control measures with regard to drugs listed in Schedule I of the Convention. These include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Limiting exclusively to medical and scientific purposes the production, manufacture, export, import, distribution of, trade in, use and possession of such drugs. Article 4.
  • Furnishing to the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) annual estimates of, among other things, quantities of such drugs to be consumed for medical and scientific purposes, utilized for the manufacture of other drugs, and held in stock. Article 19.
  • Furnishing to the INCB statistical returns on the actual production, utilization, consumption, imports and exports, seizures, and stocks of such drugs during the prior year. Article 20.
  • Requiring that licensed manufacturers of such drugs obtain quotas specifying the amounts of such drugs they may manufacture to prevent excessive production and accumulation beyond that necessary to satisfy legitimate needs. Article 29.
  • Requiring manufacturers and distributors of such drugs to be licensed. Articles 29 & 30.
  • Requiring medical prescriptions for the dispensing of such drugs to patients. Article 30.
  • Requiring importers and exporters of such drugs to be licensed and requiring each individual importation or exportation to be predicated on the issuance of a permit. Article 31.
  • Prohibiting the possession of such drugs except under legal authority. Article 33.
  • Requiring those in the legitimate distribution chain (manufacturers, distributors, scientists, and those who lawfully dispense such drugs) to keep records that show the quantities of such drugs manufactured, distributed, dispensed, acquired, or otherwise disposed of during the prior two years. Article 34.

Because the CSA was enacted in large part to satisfy United States obligations under the Single Convention, many of the CSA’s provisions directly implement the foregoing treaty requirements. None of the foregoing obligations of the United States could be satisfied for a given drug if that drug were removed entirely from the CSA schedules. At least one of the foregoing requirements (quotas) can only be satisfied if the drug that is listed in Schedule I of the Single Convention is also listed in schedule I or II of the CSA because, as 21 U.S.C. 826 indicates, the quota requirements generally apply only to schedule I and II controlled substances.

The permit requirement warrants additional explanation. As indicated above, the Single Convention obligates parties to require a permit for the importation and exportation of drugs listed in Schedule I of the Convention. This permit requirement applies to a drug product containing CBD extracted from the cannabis plant because, as further indicated above, such a product is a Schedule I drug under the Single Convention. However, under the CSA [7] and DEA regulations, the import/export permit requirement does not apply to all controlled substances. Rather, a permit is required to import or export any controlled substance in schedule I and II as well as certain controlled substances in schedules III, IV, and V. See 21 U.S.C. 952 and 953; 21 CFR 1312.11, 1312.12, 1312.21, 1312.22. Thus, in deciding what schedule is most appropriate to carry out the United States’ obligations under the Single Convention with respect to the importation and exportation of Epidiolex, I conclude there are two options:

(i) Control the drug in schedule II, which will automatically require an Start Printed Page 48952 import/export permit under existing provisions of the CSA and DEA regulations or

(ii) control the drug in schedule III, IV, or V, and simultaneously amend the regulations to require a permit to import or export Epidiolex.

It bears emphasis that where, as here, control of a drug is required by the Single Convention, the DEA Administrator “shall issue an order controlling such drug under the schedule he deems most appropriate to carry out such obligations, without regard to the findings required by [21 U.S.C. 811 (a) or 812(b)] and without regard to the procedures prescribed by [21 U.S.C. 811 (a) or (b)].” 21 U.S.C. 811(d)(1) (emphasis added). Thus, in such circumstances, the Administrator is not obligated to request a medical and scientific evaluation or scheduling recommendation from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) (as is normally done pursuant to section 811(b)). [8] Nonetheless, DEA did seek such an evaluation and recommendation from HHS with respect to the Epidiolex formulation. In responding to that request, HHS advised DEA that it found the Epidiolex formulation to have a very low potential for abuse and, therefore, recommended that, if DEA concluded that control of the drug was required under the Single Convention, Epidiolex should be placed in schedule V of the CSA. [9] Although I am not required to consider this HHS recommendation when issuing an order under section 811(d)(1), because I believe there are two legally viable scheduling options (listed above), both of which would satisfy the United States’ obligations under the Single Convention, I will exercise my discretion and choose the option that most closely aligns to the HHS recommendation. Namely, I am hereby ordering that the Epidiolex formulation (and any future FDA-approved generic versions of such formulation made from cannabis) be placed in schedule V of the CSA.

As noted, this order placing the Epidiolex formulation in schedule V will only comport with section 811(d)(1) if all importations and exportations of the drug remain subject to the permit requirement. Until now, since the Epidiolex formulation had been a schedule I controlled substance, the importation of the drug from its foreign production facility has always been subject to the permit requirement. To ensure this requirement remains in place (and thus to prevent any lapse in compliance with the requirements of the Single Convention), this order will amend the DEA regulations (21 CFR 1312.30) to add the Epidiolex formulation to the list of nonnarcotic schedule III through V controlled substances that are subject to the import and export permit requirement.

Finally, a brief explanation is warranted regarding the quota requirement in connection with the Single Convention. As indicated above, for drugs listed in Schedule I of the Convention, parties are obligated to require that licensed manufacturers of such drugs obtain quotas specifying the amounts of such drugs they may manufacture. The purpose of this treaty requirement is to prevent excessive production and accumulation beyond that necessary to satisfy legitimate needs. Under this scheduling order, the United States will continue to meet this obligation because the bulk cannabis material used to make the Epidiolex formulation (as opposed to the FDA-approved drug product in finished dosage form) will remain in schedule I of the CSA and thus be subject to all applicable quota provisions under 21 U.S.C. 826. [10]

Requirements for Handling FDA-Approved Products Containing CBD

As noted, until now, Epidiolex has been a schedule I controlled substance. By virtue of this order, Epidiolex (and any generic versions of the same formulation that might be approved by the FDA in the future) will be a schedule V controlled substance. Thus, all persons in the distribution chain who handle Epidiolex in the United States (importers, manufacturers, distributors, and practitioners) must comply with the requirements of the CSA and DEA regulations relating to schedule V controlled substances. As further indicated, any material, compound, mixture, or preparation other than Epidiolex that falls within the CSA definition of marijuana set forth in 21 U.S.C. 802(16), including any non-FDA-approved CBD extract that falls within such definition, remains a schedule I controlled substance under the CSA. [11] Thus, persons who handle such items will continue to be subject to the requirements of the CSA and DEA regulations relating to schedule I controlled substances.

Regulatory Analyses

Administrative Procedure Act

The CSA provides for an expedited scheduling action where control of a drug is required by the United States’ obligations under the Single Convention. 21 U.S.C. 811(d)(1). Under such circumstances, the Attorney General must “issue an order controlling such drug under the schedule he deems most appropriate to carry out such obligations,” without regard to the findings or procedures otherwise required for scheduling actions. Id. (emphasis added). Thus, section 811(d)(1) expressly requires that this type of scheduling action not proceed through the notice-and-comment rulemaking procedures governed by the Administrative Procedure Act (APA), which generally apply to scheduling actions; it instead requires that such scheduling action occur through the issuance of an “order.”

Although the text of section 811(d)(1) thus overrides the normal APA considerations, it is notable that the APA itself contains a provision that would have a similar effect. As set forth in 21 U.S.C. 553(a)(1), the section of the APA governing rulemaking does not apply to a “foreign affairs function of the United States.” An order issued under section 811(d)(1) may be considered a foreign affairs function of the United States because it is for the express purpose of ensuring that the Start Printed Page 48953 United States carries out its obligations under an international treaty.

Executive Order 12866, 13563, and 13771, Regulatory Planning and Review, Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review, and Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs

This action is not a significant regulatory action as defined by Executive Order 12866 (Regulatory Planning and Review), section 3(f), and the principles reaffirmed in Executive Order 13563 (Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review), and, accordingly, this action has not been reviewed by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

This order is not an Executive Order 13771 regulatory action.

Executive Order 12988, Civil Justice Reform

This action meets the applicable standards set forth in sections 3(a) and 3(b)(2) of Executive Order 12988 to eliminate drafting errors and ambiguity, minimize litigation, provide a clear legal standard for affected conduct, and promote simplification and burden reduction.

Executive Order 13132, Federalism

This action does not have federalism implications warranting the application of Executive Order 13132. This action does not have substantial direct effects on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government.

Executive Order 13175, Consultation and Coordination With Indian Tribal Governments

This action does not have tribal implications warranting the application of Executive Order 13175. The action does not have substantial direct effects on one or more Indian tribes, on the relationship between the Federal government and Indian tribes, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities between the Federal government and Indian tribes.

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Regulatory Flexibility Act

The Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA) (5 U.S.C. 601-612) applies to rules that are subject to notice and comment under section 553(b) of the APA or any other law. As explained above, the CSA exempts this order from the APA notice-and-comment rulemaking provisions. Consequently, the RFA does not apply to this action.

Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995

This action does not impose a new collection of information requirement under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. 44 U.S.C. 3501-3521. An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number.

Congressional Review Act

As noted above, this action is an order, not a rulemaking. Accordingly, the Congressional Review Act (CRA) is inapplicable, as it applies only to rules. However, the DEA has submitted a copy of this final order to both Houses of Congress and to the Comptroller General, although such filing is not required under the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996 (CRA), 5 U.S.C. 801-808.

Start List of Subjects

List of Subjects

21 CFR Part 1308

  • Administrative practice and procedure
  • Drug traffic control
  • Reporting and recordkeeping requirements

21 CFR Part 1312

  • Administrative practice and procedure
  • Drug traffic control
  • Exports
  • Imports
  • Reporting requirements

For the reasons set out above, DEA amends 21 CFR parts 1308 and 1312 as follows:

PART 1308—SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES

1. The authority citation for part 1308 continues to read as follows:

End Amendment Part Start Authority

Authority: 21 U.S.C. 811, 812, 871(b), 956(b) unless otherwise noted.

End Authority Start Amendment Part

2. In § 1308.15, add paragraph (f) to read as follows:

End Amendment Part

(f) Approved cannabidiol drugs. (1) A drug product in finished dosage formulation that has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that contains cannabidiol (2-[1R-3-methyl-6R-(1-methylethenyl)-2-cyclohexen-1-yl]-5-pentyl-1,3-benzenediol) derived from cannabis and no more than 0.1 percent (w/w) residual tetrahydrocannabinols 7367

PART 1312—IMPORTATION AND EXPORTATION OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES

3. The authority citation for part 1312 is revised to read as follows:

End Amendment Part Start Authority

End Authority Start Amendment Part

4. In § 1312.30, revise the introductory text and add pargraph (b) to read as follows:

End Amendment Part

The following Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled substances have been specifically designated by the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration as requiring import and export permits pursuant to sections 201(d)(1), 1002(b)(2), and 1003(e)(3) of the Act (21 U.S.C. 811(d)(1), 952(b)(2), and 953(e)(3)):

(b) A drug product in finished dosage formulation that has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that contains cannabidiol (2-[1R-3-methyl-6R-(1-methylethenyl)-2-cyclohexen-1-yl]-5-pentyl-1,3-benzenediol) derived from cannabis and no more than 0.1 percent (w/w) residual tetrahydrocannabinols.

Dated: September 21, 2018.

Footnotes

1. See S. Rep. No. 91-613, at 4 (1969) (“The United States has international commitments to help control the worldwide drug traffic. To honor those commitments, principally those established by the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs of 1961, is clearly a Federal responsibility.”); Control of Papaver Bracteatum, 1 Op. O.L.C. 93, 95 (1977) (“[A] number of the provisions of [the CSA] reflect Congress’ intent to comply with the obligations imposed by the Single Convention.”).

3. The drug Marinol was approved by the FDA in 1985. Marinol contains a synthetic form of dronabinol (an isomer of tetrahydrocannabinol) and thus is not made from the cannabis plant.

4. The text of the Single Convention capitalizes schedules (e.g., “Schedule I”). In contrast, the text of the CSA generally refers to schedules in lower case. This document will follow this approach of using capitalization or lower case depending on whether the schedule is under the Single Convention or the CSA.

It should also be noted that the schedules of the Single Convention operate somewhat differently than the schedules of the CSA. Unlike the CSA, the Single Convention imposes additional restrictions on drugs listed in Schedule IV that go beyond those applicable to drugs listed in Schedule I. All drugs in Schedule IV of the Single Convention are also in Schedule I of the Convention. Cannabis and cannabis resin are among the drugs listed in Schedule IV of the Single Convention.

5. There are numerous isomers of cannabidiol, which will be referred to here collectively as “CBD.”

6. Although the Single Convention does not define the term “extract,” the ordinary meaning of that term would include a product, such as a concentrate of a certain chemical or chemicals, obtained by a physical or chemical process. See, e.g., Webster’s Third New International Dictionary 806 (1976). Thus, the term extract of cannabis would include any product that is made by subjecting cannabis material to a physical or chemical process designed to isolate or increase the concentration of one or more of the cannabinoid constituents.

7. The provisions of federal law relating to the import and export of controlled substances—those found in 21 U.S.C. 951 through 971—are more precisely referred to as the Controlled Substances Import and Export Act (CSIEA). However, federal courts and DEA often use the term “CSA” to refer collectively to all provisions from 21 U.S.C. 801 through 971 and, for ease of exposition, this document will do likewise.

8. In the House Report to the bill that would become the CSA (H. Rep. No. 91-1444, at 36 (1970)), this issue is explained as follows:

Under subsection [811(d)], where control of a drug or other substance by the United States is required by reason of its obligations under [the Single Convention], the bill does not require that the Attorney General seek an evaluation and recommendation by the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, or pursue the procedures for control prescribed by the bill but he may include the drug or other substance under any of the five schedules of the bill which he considers most appropriate to carry out the obligations of the United States under the international instrument, and he may do so without making the specific findings otherwise required for inclusion of a drug or other substance in that schedule.

9. HHS most recently updated its medical and scientific evaluation and scheduling recommendation for the Epidiolex formulation by letter to DEA dated June 13, 2018.

10. At present, the cannabis used to make Epidiolex is grown in the United Kingdom and the drug is imported into the United States in finished dosage form.

11. Nothing in this order alters the requirements of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act that might apply to products containing CBD. In announcing its recent approval of Epidiolex, the FDA Commissioner stated:

[W]e remain concerned about the proliferation and illegal marketing of unapproved CBD-containing products with unproven medical claims. . . . The FDA has taken recent actions against companies distributing unapproved CBD products. These products have been marketed in a variety of formulations, such as oil drops, capsules, syrups, teas, and topical lotions and creams. These companies have claimed that various CBD products could be used to treat or cure serious diseases such as cancer with no scientific evidence to support such claims.

CBD Has Never Been A Controlled Substance

My job is to shed light. Most specifically on the great intricacies of cannabis law, policy, and regulation. The past several years have seen extensive debate about the legal status of cannabidiol (CBD). Is it legal? Was it ever a controlled substance? How is it regulated? Lawyers, industry professionals, and learned scholars debate this with so much vigor that it creates confusion, if not a misstatement of the facts. It hurts my ears and burns my eyes to hear or see an argument that identifies CBD as a controlled substance, because the law is quite clear in this regard.

For something to be a controlled substance under the Federal Controlled Substances Act (CSA), it must be specifically scheduled and assigned one of five scheduling criteria. Schedule I is the most restrictive, which indicates that this controlled substance has no medicinal value and a high potential for abuse. Schedule V, the least restrictive, indicates a drug with currently accepted medical uses and treatments in the United States and a low potential for abuse. Schedule V drugs typically consist of preparations containing limited quantities of certain narcotics, but not always. When one combs through the CSA, the word “cannabidiol” or “CBD” is nowhere to be found — not in the code of federal regulations or in the enacting legislation. One must look deeper to find out what is scheduled and what is not.

Hemp-derived CBD oil

First, let’s look at the definition of marijuana with an “H” (marihuana), which is indeed scheduled. This comprises all parts of the Cannabis Sativa L. plant, excluding non-viable seeds stock and fiber, but including the resins and the remainder of the plant. CBD, of course, is present within the marijuana plant. If you derive CBD from the marijuana plant, it would in fact be controlled, because it came from a controlled substance. This is known as the “source rule” — the source of the material dictates its legality. But what if CBD and other non-psychoactive cannabinoids are derived from a legal source, such as the 25 other plant species that contain levels of cannabinoids or industrial hemp?

The only cannabinoid mentioned in the CSA is tetrahydrocannabinol, THC, the psychoactive compound in cannabis. While it is specifically scheduled, courts have disagreed on whether THC needs to be synthetically or naturally derived to fall within the definition of tetrahydrocannabinol under the CSA. Six years ago, industrial hemp was for the first time ever defined separately from marijuana as holding less than 0.3 Δ9-THC percent by dry weight. The 2014 Farm Bill specifically authorized the use of industrial hemp as a legal substance for purposes of market, scientific, and agricultural-based research. The CBD industry exploded because of the “market-based research exception” — one could only study the plant with a viable market in place for its products. This position was litigated in 2018 in HIA v. DEA III and the restrictions were removed by the 2018 Farm Bill.

The industrial hemp plant is no longer a controlled substance, including all of its derivatives, not the least of which is THC. Even THC from industrial hemp is no longer defined as a controlled substance (we’ll dive into this in more detail at a later time). The 2018 Farm Bill didn’t remove CBD from the Controlled Substances Act, but clarified that it was never on it. To be perfectly clear, if CBD is derived from a lawful substance, it is not and never has been a controlled substance. That’s a fact and the law.

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Yet complexities and legal challenges remain. Greenwich Biosciences (the North American subsidiary of GW Pharmaceutical) had received approval for the new drug, Epidiolex, which was identified and placed on schedule V. While CBD was not defined as schedule V, Epidiolex was because the CBD present in it is derived from marijuana. But as with every other aspect of the growth of the cannabis industry, the law rules. The makers of Epidiolex recently requested that it be removed entirely from the schedule of substances and the DEA agreed with this request.

When derived from lawful materials such as hemp, CBD and other non-psychoactive cannabinoids are not controlled substances because they’re not specifically scheduled. Still, there is pushback. Some folks refer to the Analogue Act, a section of the CSA passed in 1986 allowing any chemical similar to a schedule I or II substance to be listed as schedule I if it’s intended for human consumption. However, CBD is not identified as a chemical in schedule I or schedule II and is one of more than 100 identified cannabinoids contained within the cannabis plant.

The nexus of cannabis law, policy, and regulations has evolved a great deal in the past decade. Prior to the 2014 and the 2018 Farm Bill there was no legal distinction – it was all marijuana. Now, our definitions of cannabis are rooted in science and a plant’s legality is judged based on its chemical makeup.

Despite the perceived uncertainty regarding the legality of the compound CBD, we can officially put it to rest. Unless derived specifically and strictly from a marijuana plant, CBD is not now, and has never been, a controlled substance.

Is CBD a Schedule 1 Drug?

Recent changes to federal legislation categorized certain CBD products as Schedule 5 substances, which are considered to be the least dangerous and addictive.

Written by Cathy Rozyczko — Edited by Jason Brett on September 27, 2021

The short answer: Yes…and no.

If you’ve been following the national conversation about cannabis, you may have felt confused at one point or another. The legalities that surround cannabis and cannabis-derived products like CBD oil are complex, and there’s a lot of conflicting information out there.

In September 2018, the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) released an official statement , outlining their removal of “FDA-approved drugs that contain CBD derived from cannabis and no more than 0.1 percent tetrahydrocannabinols [THC]” from the list of Schedule 1 drugs. However, cannabis remains a Schedule 1 drug.

Don’t worry. Below you’ll find information on how marijuana and CBD fit into the DEA’s drug schedule and more importantly, learn whether purchasing CBD oil is the right—and legal—choice for your situation.

Schedule 1 vs. Schedule 5 Drugs

The DEA divides drugs, substances, and certain chemicals into one of five categories, or “schedules” . The DEA considers Schedule 1 (I) drugs to be the most dangerous and addictive and Schedule 5 (V) drugs to be the least, with Schedule 2 (II), 3 (III), and 4 (IV) drugs falling somewhere in between.

Schedule 1 drugs are defined as having no currently accepted medical use and the highest potential for abuse. Examples of Schedule 1 drugs include heroin, LSD, cocaine, methamphetamines, and cannabis.

The DEA defines Schedule 5 drugs as medications containing low quantities of narcotics (i.e. opioids) and having a relatively low potential for abuse. Some examples of Schedule 5 drugs include Robitussin AC, Lyrica, anti-diarrheal medications, and now Epidiolex, which contains CBD and is commonly used to treat epilepsy in children with Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

CBD products can fall into either the Schedule 1 category or the Schedule 5 category depending on the ingredients, FDA approval, and perhaps most importantly, where they’re being purchased.

The First Schedule 5 CBD Product

Historically, any product containing an extract from the cannabis plant, like CBD oil, was classified as a Schedule 1 drug. Now though, there’s an exception.

The DEA announced in September 2018 that cannabis-derived CBD products could have Schedule 5 status, as long as they have:

  • THC levels of 0.1% or lower.
  • Been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Despite cannabis having been a Schedule 1 drug since 1970, the FDA approved Epidiolex, a CBD-based medication for epilepsy in June 2018. If the DEA had not made the above CBD reclassification in September, Epidiolex would not have been available under prescription. (It is for this same reason that physicians who practice in certain states are only able to recommend CBD to their patients, not prescribe it.)

Unfortunately, the FDA is very selective in which products it approves, and at the time of this writing, Epidiolex remains the only CBD product that falls into the Schedule 5 category.

Because cannabis and its derivatives are in the Schedule 1 category, non-Epidiolex CBD products are also considered to be Schedule 1 substances on the federal level (your state has the final say as to whether cannabis and CBD specifically are safe and legal for consumption—more on that below).

But cannabidiol is just one component of the whole cannabis plant, and it’s important to understand the distinction between the two.

CBD and Cannabis: What’s the Difference?

The Cannabis sativa plant can be broadly split into two varieties: hemp and marijuana. Both plants contain over 100 cannabinoids, including cannabidiol (CBD) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) . While marijuana has a high THC content, hemp is richer in CBD. It’s THC that produces the intoxicating, high-producing effects felt by people who smoke marijuana. CBD, on the other hand, is not intoxicating and will not get you high.

CBD is extracted from the hemp plant, meaning it naturally contains low levels of THC. Furthermore, CBD product makers typically try to isolate the CBD as much as possible knowing they have customers who’d like the benefits of CBD without the high of THC.

Though, the very fact that CBD is derived from the cannabis plant places it into something of a legal quagmire, despite the fact that cannabidiol does not negatively impact your mental or physical capacities. For now, on the federal level, CBD oil and other cannabidiol products remain Schedule 1 substances (except for Epiliodex).

Federal Law vs. State Law

So, if most CBD products are classified as Schedule 1 drugs, why are they available for sale online , in wellness stores, coffee shops, and even certain Walgreens and CVS locations ?

With the passing of the 2018 Farm Bill and an ever-growing amount of research being published about the potential health benefits and medical uses of CBD , many states have taken legalization into their own hands. Now, a majority of states have either decriminalized or legalized the use of cannabis products, including CBD oil.

State-Specific Laws on CBD

Depending on the state in which you live or in which you want to purchase CBD, the DEA’s drug scheduling system may be of the utmost importance, or it may not matter at all. In terms of CBD availability, states can be split into three groups: red states, amber states and green states.

Red states are in line with federal law, meaning any cannabis products, including CBD oil, are illegal. Currently, the red states are:

  • Idaho.
  • Nebraska.
  • South Dakota.

If you live in one of these three states, you won’t legally be able to purchase or consume CBD products. As more research is conducted and the stigma around CBD use continues to disappear, you could see a change in the (hopefully) near future.

Amber states allow some CBD products to be sold under certain conditions, specifically, for medical use. In order to legally purchase CBD oil in amber states, you may need to possess a medical marijuana card or have a prescription from your doctor. Currently, the amber states where it’s legal to purchase and use any cannabis product—including those with THC—for medicinal purposes are:

  • Arizona.
  • Arkansas.
  • Connecticut.
  • Delaware.
  • Florida.
  • Hawaii.
  • Illinois.
  • Louisiana.
  • Maryland.
  • Minnesota.
  • Missouri.
  • Montana.
  • New Hampshire.
  • New Jersey.
  • New Mexico.
  • New York.
  • North Dakota.
  • Ohio.
  • Oklahoma.
  • Pennsylvania.
  • Rhode Island.
  • Utah.
  • West Virginia.

Amber states where it’s legal to purchase cannabis only in the form of CBD products for medicinal purposes are:

  • Alabama.
  • Georgia.
  • Indiana.
  • Iowa.
  • Kansas.
  • Kentucky.
  • Mississippi.
  • North Carolina.
  • South Carolina.
  • Tennessee.
  • Texas.
  • Virginia.
  • Wisconsin.
  • Wyoming.

So, if you live in an amber state, it’s especially important you be familiar with the laws specific to cannabis and CBD products. In some states, you can legally purchase any cannabis-derived products for medical reasons; in others, you can legally only purchase CBD products (with little to no THC) for medical reasons.

Green states are the most flexible of all and allow for the sale and consumption of cannabis and cannabis-derived products for medicinal and recreational purposes. Currently the green states include:

  • Alaska
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Maine
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Nevada
  • Oregon
  • Vermont
  • Washington
  • Washington D.C.

If you live in one of these 11 states you can buy anything from ‘special,’ THC-infused brownies to CBD oil, as long as you meet the minimum age requirements. In green states, you will find CBD oil available in a large number of stores and will only need a photo ID in order to make a purchase.

Purchasing CBD in Your State

CBD is considered illegal under federal law, but your state’s laws take precedence.

If you live in a green state that allows for the sale and consumption of cannabis products for any reason, or an amber state that allows cannabis or CBD for medical reasons and you qualify, it’s perfectly legal for you to buy and use CBD products.

If you’re interested in using CBD oil or related CBD products and it is legal in your state, don’t hesitate to speak to your primary physician about it. You can also speak to a cannabis doctor for more information on using CBD to treat certain conditions.

The information contained in this page is meant to serve as an educational tool and should not be substituted for legal advice. While this article was correct at the time of publishing, it is wise to get up-to-date, state-specific legal information before making any CBD purchase.

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