Cbd oil with thc for vapeing

Features of vape with THC & CBD

What is THC vape oil? Features of vape with THC & CBD

Many people are using THC liquid for vaping nowadays – but what is THC vape oil, and how does it affect you?

Vaping THC is popular among people who suffer from anxiety or chronic pain, as THC seems to reduce both. Some research also suggests that THC reduces nausea. However, THC has some drawbacks and side effects.

Whether you’re a vaper looking to try something new, or a tobacco smoker who’s considering switching to vape products, it’s important to learn about THC before using THC vape oil.

What is THC vape oil?

Cannabis and hemp plants contain dozens of chemicals, called cannabinoids, which affect the body in various ways. Two of the most well-known cannabinoids are tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). Each cannabinoid affects the body in different ways.

THC vape oil – also known as THC e-liquid or THC vape juice – is a concentrated form of THC that has been distilled into a liquid that you can vape. Vaporizers heat this liquid and turn it into vapor, which you can then inhale.

THC vape oil is made specifically for vaping. You can also get THC or cannabis oil that is intended for ingestion – you usually drop it under the tongue and wait for the effects to kick in. While you can use this cannabis oil for vaping, it will probably need to be diluted first.

People often prefer vaping to smoking cannabis – whether through joints or pipes – because vaping THC oil is easier on the lungs. Vaping involves high heat, but it doesn’t involve burning anything, which is what smoking essentially is.

How to use THC liquid for vaping.

Not sure how to use liquid THC? Each vaporizer is different, and the instructions will differ between types. You can use a vaporizing pen or a desktop vaporizer, depending on what you prefer.

Here’s how to use THC liquid in a vape pen. Bear in mind that vape pens vary. If you’re unsure how to use yours, double-check the instructions.

  • Charge your vape, if needed.
  • Add a few drops of the THC vape juice to the chamber or tank in your vape pen. If possible, consider getting a pre-filled THC liquid vape cartridge.
  • Turn the vape on and inhale. Some vapes require you to press a button whenever you inhale, while others are automatic.
  • Repeat as much as you’d like.

Can you vape regular cannabis oil? Yes.

Be aware that THC liquid might make you feel very high, very quickly. If you’re new to vaping THC, take the slow route: take one or two puffs and pause for a few minutes before continuing. It’s also a good idea to go for a weaker THC liquid in the beginning.

Side effects of THC oil and THC vaping.

The biggest side effect of vaping THC oil is that it can get you high pretty quickly. While some people enjoy the intoxicating effect, others dislike the feeling. It’s definitely not a good idea to vape THC before operating heavy machinery or doing brain-intensive work, like taking a test.

Most drug tests check for THC, so be aware of this before using it.

There are also a few other side effects of THC, such as:

  • Dry mouth
  • Slower reflexes
  • Red eyes
  • Fatigue
  • Memory loss
  • Increased heart rate
  • Increased anxiety

Everybody is different, and while some people experience these side effects intensely, others don’t experience them at all.

What are the benefits of vaping CBD oil?

CBD is another well-known cannabinoid. So far, there’s a fair amount of scientific research on the benefits of CBD. While it shares some characteristics with THC, it’s remarkably different in its own way.

Much like THC, CBD has a number of health benefits. Many of the health benefits of THC overlap with the benefits of CBD; for example, CBD has also been linked to reducing stress and anxiety and soothing pain. CBD also offers a few health benefits that aren’t associated with THC.

Here are a few of the most well-known health benefits of CBD:

  • Seizures. CBD has been proven to treat certain seizure conditions. In fact, a CBD-based drug named Epidiolex is now commercially available for the treatment of certain forms of epilepsy.
  • Inflammation. CBD is an anti-inflammatory chemical , which makes it great for treating inflammatory chronic diseases and injuries.
  • Anxiety. A lot of scientific research suggests CBD has anti-anxiety properties and can reduce one’s general stress levels. A study , which involved giving CBD to subjects just before a public speaking test, found that CBD reduced anxiety.
  • Nausea and vomiting. A 2010 study suggests that CBD might reduce nausea and vomiting in chemo patients, and a 2011 study concluded that CBD can reduce general nausea.
  • Pain. CBD is an analgesic, which means it can reduce pain. A 2018 review of studies found that CBD effectively reduces cancer-related pain, fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain.

Are there side effects of CBD? According to this extensive review , CBD is considered safe and it is well-tolerated by humans. This means that we are able to consume large amounts without it threatening our health. However, there are some side effects of CBD, like diarrhea, changes in appetite, and fatigue.

Vaping CBD oil vs vaping THC oil.

You might be wondering: should I vape CBD oil or THC oil?

It depends on your own personal preferences and needs. If you don’t mind – or enjoy – getting high, THC might be right for you. If you want to experience a range of health benefits without the high, consider trying CBD oil.

Here’s a quick comparison of the apparent benefits of CBD vs the benefits of THC:

Everything You Need to Know About Vaping CBD Oil

Verywell Mind content is rigorously reviewed by a team of qualified and experienced fact checkers. Fact checkers review articles for factual accuracy, relevance, and timeliness. We rely on the most current and reputable sources, which are cited in the text and listed at the bottom of each article. Content is fact checked after it has been edited and before publication. Learn more.

Sean is a fact-checker and researcher with experience in sociology and field research.

Vaping has been around for more than a decade now and is growing in popularity—especially among teens and young adults. One of the newest trends impacting this growing vape culture is the desire to vape cannabidiol (CBD) oil. In fact, using this oil in vape pens is becoming increasingly popular and the industry is expected to grow exponentially over the next few years according to the Brightfield Group, a firm that studies the CBD market.

Part of the draw to CBD oil in areas where marijuana has been legalized is the fact that it has been touted as helping treat a host of medical problems. Some of the medical issues people claim that the oil treats include epileptic seizures, anxiety, inflammation, and sleeplessness. However, there is very little evidence backing up these claims with the exception of treating epilepsy.

In fact, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved only one CBD-based medication, which is used to treat seizures associated with two severe forms of epilepsy. But, when it comes to CBD in general, they stress that it cannot be added to food, drinks, or dietary supplements. And although the FDA has warned manufacturers against making unproven health claims, it has not done much to stop the sale of CBD products.

What Is CBD Oil?

CBD oil is extracted from the flowers and buds of marijuana or hemp plants. Typically, it does not produce a “high” or intoxication because it contains very little, if any, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). In fact, CBD oil is only permitted to contain less than 0.3% of THC. CBD oil is legal in states where medicinal or recreational marijuana is legal. Meanwhile, several other states have CBD-specific laws on the books even though marijuana is not yet legal there.

According to the FDA, it is currently illegal to market CBD by adding it to food or marketing it as a supplement. Despite these guidelines, they warn consumers that some CBD products are being marketed with unproven medical claims and are of unknown quality. They also caution consumers that CBD can harm the liver and may interact with other medications you are taking. And, it may even have a negative impact on male fertility.

Is Vaping CBD Oil Safe?

Generally speaking, vaping is an unsafe practice regardless of what substances are in the vape pen. And, CBD oil is no exception. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recently linked vaping products to an outbreak of nearly 3,000 lung illnesses that were so serious that even young people were being admitted to the hospital. Meanwhile, nearly 70 people have died from what is now being called EVALI (e-cigarette and vaping associated lung injury). And, the CDC believes thousands more may have admitted to the hospital with lung issues related to vaping.

Although the CDC has traced many of the EVALI hospitalizations back to vitamin E acetate, a substance used to dilute oils used in vaping, the risks of vaping CBD oil are not without risk, especially if the vape pens are obtained from illicit dealers, online sources, or friends. At least 26 of the EVALI cases were hospitalized after vaping CBD oil.

Additionally, numerous scientists, doctors, and researchers are concerned with the safety of inhaling CBD oil because little is known about the long-term effects. What’s more, when vaping devices are heated, a chemical reaction takes place in the vapor, which could pose additional risks to the lungs, especially in young people.

And despite the fact that the 2018 Farm Bill removed CBD from the definition of marijuana in the Controlled Substances Act, it is still subject to the same laws and regulations as other substances monitored by the FDA. Unfortunately, though, there is very little regulatory oversight of CBD oil in general—even though vaping is one of the most popular ways of using the oil. In fact, the FDA has not yet determined how to regulate CBD vaping products just yet.

But many people are hoping those regulations will happen soon. Even the CBD industry is concerned and asking for oversight. For instance, without more regulations, organizations like the U.S. Hemp Authority are unable to certify CBD oils as it does with CBD topicals, tinctures, and edibles. And, until that happens, consumers have very little way of knowing what they are getting when they purchase a CBD oil.

To make matters worse, this lack of certification has lead people to sell vaping liquid they claim contains CBD oil when it actually contains harmful chemicals, which is injuring and killing people in the process. To determine the extent to which this is occurring, the Associated Press (AP) commissioned a study to analyze the contents of nearly 30 oils claiming to contain CBD.

Their testing was completed by Flora Research Laboratories in Grants Pass, Oregon, which is licensed and inspected by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. What they discovered is that 10 of the 30 vapes contained synthetic marijuana while others had no CBD oil at all. Additionally, eight oils had no detectable level of CBD while 14 were less than 0.3% CBD by weight. The other six ranged between 1.07% and 8.87% CBD by weight.

Because this testing was a such a small sample, the AP noted that their sampling is not representative of the entire CBD market. However, their testing does show just how risky it is to vape CBD oil when there is little to no regulation of the product. Vapers have no idea what they are getting when they take a puff.

A Word From Verywell

If you are considering vaping CBD oil as a way to address a medical concern, talk to your doctor first. The risks associated with vaping and CBD oil are significant and may not provide the benefits you want.

And if you or a loved one are struggling with substance use or addiction, contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Helpline at 1-800-662-4357 for information on support and treatment facilities in your area. For more mental health resources, see Verywell’s National Helpline Database.

What to Know About Vaping THC Oil

Verywell Mind articles are reviewed by board-certified physicians and mental healthcare professionals. Medical Reviewers confirm the content is thorough and accurate, reflecting the latest evidence-based research. Content is reviewed before publication and upon substantial updates. Learn more.

John C. Umhau, MD, MPH, CPE is board-certified in addiction medicine and preventative medicine. He is the medical director at Alcohol Recovery Medicine. For over 20 years Dr. Umhau was a senior clinical investigator at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Verywell Mind content is rigorously reviewed by a team of qualified and experienced fact checkers. Fact checkers review articles for factual accuracy, relevance, and timeliness. We rely on the most current and reputable sources, which are cited in the text and listed at the bottom of each article. Content is fact checked after it has been edited and before publication. Learn more.

Adah Chung is a fact checker, writer, researcher, and occupational therapist.

Verywell / Alex Dos Diaz

As more states legalize medical and recreational marijuana use, you may be curious about the types of products available to you. The popularity of vaping tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) oil is one that is on the rise.

Vaping THC oil involves heating the oil and inhaling it through a vaporizing device like a vape pen or e-cigarette. Many healthcare providers are concerned about the health-related effects of this THC product type.

Also Known As: A THC vaping device can be referred to as a vape pen, dab pen, wax pen, THC pen, e-hookah, or mod. THC oil is sometimes called vape juice, 710 (OIL spelled backward), wax, shatter, or black glass. The container that holds the oil is known as a pod.

Drug Class: Marijuana has long been known for both its stimulant and depressant properties. However, it is also sometimes classified as a hallucinogen.

Common Side Effects: Cannabis vaping can result in side effects such as cough, chest pain, shortness of breath, and gastrointestinal issues.

How to Recognize THC Vaping Oil & Devices

The appearance of THC oil vaping devices can vary, ranging from having a pen-like shape to being rectangular or oval. The oil either comes pre-filled in the device or is sold in compact containers (pods) for refillable devices. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers a helpful visual dictionary for identifying both THC vaping devices and oils.

What Does Vaping THC Oil Do?

THC is the main psychoactive compound found in marijuana and the substance that makes you feel “high.” In addition to giving a euphoric feeling, THC is also believed to impact pain, mood, and other feelings. It provides these effects through the way it impacts cannabinoid receptors in the brain.

While people can react to THC differently, some of the most common reasons people use marijuana include helping with anxiety, insomnia, chronic pain, and depression. Additionally, vaping is the third most common marijuana consumption method, followed by smoking and edibles.

What the Experts Say

Research suggests that vaping THC oil, especially oil that contains vitamin E acetate, can be particularly harmful to the lungs. Vitamin E acetate, which is regularly added to THC when preparing it for use in e-cigarettes and vaping devices, is particularly harmful when it’s inhaled.

In 2019, the dangers of vaping came to light. In September of that year, health officials began investigating an outbreak of a severe lung disease associated with vaping and e-cigarettes. By December, 2,561 cases of the lung disease often referred to as e-cigarette or vaping use-associated lung injury (EVALI) had resulted in hospitalization or death.

Nearly 70 deaths have been confirmed from EVALI, spanning 29 states and the District of Columbia. Additionally, 82% of people hospitalized reported using THC-containing products, with 33% reporting the use of these products exclusively.

Currently, the CDC recommends that people avoid using e-cigarettes and vaping products—particularly those that contain THC oil. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has joined the CDC in this recommendation.

Vaping THC oil just once can significantly impact your lungs. A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that first-time and infrequent users of marijuana were more likely to experience adverse reactions from vaping THC oil.

This study’s authors suggest that the negative impacts of this THC ingestion method are largely due to the enhanced delivery of the oil. This was evidenced by participants having more pronounced effects and experiencing significant impacts on their motor skills and cognitive abilities.

Marijuana concentrates, such as those used in vaping, also have incredibly high THC levels—up to four times as high as those found in top-shelf marijuana. This may also explain why their effects are more enhanced.

Off-Label or Recently Approved Uses

The FDA has approved a few THC-containing medications for use with certain medical conditions, such as those related to cancer, AIDS, and epilepsy. However, these medications use purified chemicals that are either derived from or based on those contained within the marijuana plant.

Because the long-term impact of marijuana use in less-purified forms is unknown, the FDA does not approve of THC use in any form beyond these medications. This would include vaping THC oil.

Common Side Effects

Marijuana use, in general, has both short- and long-term side effects. Some of its short-term effects include:

  • Coordination issues
  • Distorted senses (such as sight, sound, touch)
  • Increased anxiety
  • Increased heart rate
  • Issues with attention, memory, and learning

Longer-lasting side effects of marijuana use include learning, memory, and sleep issues. People who use marijuana repeatedly over time may also experience effects such as:

  • Increased risk of addiction
  • Increased risk of chronic cough
  • Increased risk of schizophrenia (if a genetic risk also exists)
  • Learning and memory issues

Using marijuana in higher doses, sometimes referred to as marijuana intoxication, can also result in a variety of side effects, some of which include:

  • Dry mouth
  • Impaired motor skills
  • Impaired perception
  • Red eyes issues

There are a few side effects that have been associated specifically with vaping THC oil, especially for people who vape infrequently. Among them are:

Vaping can injure the lungs, resulting in symptoms such as a rapid onset cough, breathing troubles, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and weight loss.

Signs of Use

How do you know if someone in your life might be vaping THC oil? Signs of marijuana use can include:

  • Being drowsy during the daytime
  • Having bloodshot eyes
  • Inability to judge time
  • Increased cough or wheezing
  • Increased hunger for no apparent reason
  • Lack of focus or inability to concentrate
  • Secretive behavior
  • Trouble with coordination
  • Unusually talkative
  • Vaping devices or oils in their possession or in their room
  • Weird, unexplained smells (some THC vaping oils are flavored, resulting in a variety of scents)

Marijuana vaping use is on the rise, particularly in certain age groups. For instance, the number of college-age students who’ve vaped in the past month increased from 5.2% to 14% in just two years’ time. A 2022 study adds that the number of teens vaping cannabis in the last 30 days increased seven-fold from 2013 to 2020.

Common Questions

There are a couple of misconceptions surrounding both THC and vaping.

THC Is Not the Same as CBD

Some people confuse THC with CBD (cannabidiol), another cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant. However, it’s important to note that CBD oil and THC oil impact the body in completely different ways.

One notable difference is that while THC has psychoactive properties, CBD does not. As a result, CBD does not make you high, and it is believed to work with other receptors in the body to produce an overall feeling of well-being.

There are legality differences too. As of February 2022, 37 states and four territories have approved the use of marijuana for medical purposes and 18 states and two territories have approved marijuana for recreational use.

Even though these states and territories allow marijuana use for medical or recreational purposes, it is still illegal under federal law. Conversely, the 2018 Farm Bill removed hemp (of which CBD oil is a derivative) from the definition of marijuana, making it legal federally as long as it contains 0.3% THC or less.

Vaping THC Is Not Safer Than Smoking It

A 2018 Gallup Poll found that most Americans believe that vaping is less harmful than smoking, with 40% of the respondents indicating that marijuana was “not too” harmful. Some think this because vaping involves inhaling vapor rather than smoke. The issue is that there isn’t enough research to support this belief.

Research indicates that the dangers of vaping include having no regulation of the compounds in vaping products (so you don’t know what you’re getting); the fact that vaping delivers a higher amount of THC; and the potential of heating coils in vaping devices to increase exposure to carcinogens.

Other health experts warn that vaping marijuana may even damage the lungs more so than smoking or vaping nicotine. This doesn’t mean that vaping nicotine is safe, but that vaping THC oil is thought to create a greater amount of lung damage.

A study published in Addiction adds that while vaping nicotine may be safer than smoking cigarettes, the same may not hold true when it comes to marijuana. In fact, additives like vitamin E acetate may make this delivery method even more dangerous than smoking a joint, putting the person’s lungs at a greater risk for injury.

Although the FDA has not approved the use of THC and it remains illegal under federal law, people are experimenting with the drug more frequently by either smoking it, eating it, or vaping it.

Tolerance, Dependence, and Withdrawal

If you vape THC oil regularly, you may develop a tolerance, potentially through the way cannabis creates neuroadaptive changes in the brain. Vaping THC oil can also lead to a substance use disorder.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) estimates that between 9% and 30% of people who use marijuana develop some sort of substance use disorder. Also, people who begin using marijuana before they turn 18 are four to seven times more likely than adults to develop cannabis use disorder.

How Long Does THC Vaping Oil Stay In Your System?

The amount of time THC stays in your system varies based on a variety of factors. Among them are how often you use it, how much of it you use, your consumption methods, and the rate at which your body metabolizes the drug.

One study of people with heavy cannabis use found that THC was detectable in their saliva for up to 78 hours, in their blood for at least 7 days, and in their urine for up to 5 days. Those who use the drug less frequently would likely have smaller detection windows.

Another study looked at how long THC showed up in the saliva after vaping it, smoking it, or consuming edibles. It noted that THC levels were higher both immediately and later in people who smoked or vaped when compared to those using edibles.

Addiction

The National Institute on Drug Abuse shares that cannabis use disorder can turn into a marijuana addiction if the usage of this drug cannot be stopped even when it interferes with various aspects of your life. This could include causing issues at work, school, or home.

Additionally, because some confuse dependence with addiction, it is unclear exactly how many people may be addicted to marijuana. Though, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) estimates that one in 10 people using marijuana will develop an addiction.

In a survey of 9,003 U.S. adults, one-half of them said that they felt that addiction is a risk of marijuana use.

Withdrawal

People with a history of long-term marijuana use (including vaping THC oil) may experience mild withdrawal symptoms if they stop. These include:

  • Anxiety
  • Cravings
  • Insomnia
  • Reduced appetite

Symptoms such as these can make it difficult to quit using marijuana. Though they are typically mild, if they are bothersome or severe, talk to your healthcare provider. They may be able to help.

How to Get Help

Several options exist for people who want help with their marijuana use. Ones that seem to provide the best outcome include:

    , which includes learning how to identify and correct behaviors, resulting in better self-control and the resolution of issues contributing to drug use
  • Contingency management, which is a form of behavioral therapy that involves monitoring certain behaviors and instituting rewards if a specific positive behavior occurs, or rewarding a lack of the behavior if that is the desired outcome , which helps promote motivation within the individual to change, and to engage in treatment

At this time, no medications are FDA-approved to treat cannabis use disorder, but research is ongoing for several options that may help by relieving issues related to stress, anxiety, and trouble sleeping.

If you or a loved one is struggling with substance use or addiction, contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Helpline at 1-800-662-4357 for information on support and treatment facilities in your area.