How To Make CBD Oil From Stems And Roots

The center of attention is usually your flowers, but the roots of cannabis have incredible medicinal powers. Useful ways to recycle your cannabis plant. Read on if you've ever wondered what to do with left over leaves, marijuana stalks, cannabis roots and stems Yes, cannabis has many potential medical benefits, but don’t forget about the roots! Here’s what you can do with cannabis roots & what they can do for you.

How To Make CBD Oil From Stems And Roots

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WHAT TO DO WITH CANNABIS ROOTS AFTER HARVEST

With the end of our cultivation cycle, we are face some harvest leftovers. So what to do with the roots of those beautiful healthy plants you grew? Here, we tell you how to make medicines from them!

You have already taken care of your cannabis plants for a whole cycle. You’ve harvested beautiful and fragrant buds, and overcame all the cultivation obstacles.

Now, you’ve probably found yourself surrounded by leftover roots – and you don’t know what to do with them. We recommend that you do not throw these beauties away! The center of attention is usually your flowers, but the roots of cannabis have incredible medicinal powers.

You can make ointments and healing teas to treat minor infections to inflammation of the skin. Since ancient times, cannabis roots have been used by many people as a powerful medicine, and you may be surprised at how effective they are.

Got curious about it? Here, we’ll tell you more about how to use your cannabis roots after harvest!

The root of cannabis in traditional medicine

Important: although these extracts that we will talk about next can be indicated for many purposes, it is important to always talk to your doctor about their use. These substances found in the root of cannabis can interact with other types of drugs if you’re on any kind of prescription

The first records of the medicinal use of cannabis roots date back to around two thousand years before Christ, and were found in manuscripts translated as “The classic of herbal medicine”. In this ancient kind of encyclopedia, Chinese healers described the action of cannabis root as a powerful pain medicine. Later, Roman civilization would also use it for cramps, gout, joint pain, other types of acute pain – and even to reduce bleeding in women during labour.

With prohibitionism, of course, this type of medicine was basically wiped out of our lives. But, research brought these ancient manuscripts to light, today we have more information on how to prepare and use them correctly.

The properties of cannabis root

Cannabis root has different terpenes: friedelin, pentacyclic, triterpene ketones and epifriedelanol, which have significant health benefits. Friedelin is an antioxidant that protects the liver; epifriedelanol has antitumor benefits; and the other two have been shown to kill cancer cells, reduce inflammation and relieve pain.

It can also be effective for:

Improve the health of cells (mainly cell membranes);

Soothe burned, inflamed or bruised skin.

How to clean your cannabis roots

To make your medicinal recipes, it is better to use fresh roots, which usually have more nutrients – but only from plants grown in clean soil. That’s because cannabis is great for cleaning contaminated soil, and ends up absorbing pollutants (including heavy metals). If that’s the case with your plant, throw it away! The roots will not do well, in fact, they can have a very negative effect.

For clean roots, the process is not that complicated. You should gently pull them off the earth, taking care to break as few wires as possible. When the roots are free, separate them from the stem with a sharp knife. After that, wash them with warm water, and remove the excess soil with the help of a soft-bristled toothbrush.

After the roots are clean, put all of them in a cool, dark place for 48 hours to dry them completely. After drying, you have two options: you can boil the roots in water or grind them into powder. Both methods work, but grinding the roots into powder allows you to use them in a variety of ways!

To make a soothing balm

To make your own balm, follow the steps above to extract, clean and dry the roots of your cannabis plant. After drying, grind the roots into a fine powder (it can be done with the help of a grater or a food processor).

After turning it into powder, you can mix it with any type of oil or fat. We recommend coconut oil – use the powder of 1 to 2 balls of root, 4 cups of oil and 2 cups of water. Place the mixture in a saucepan over low heat or in a water bath, and cook slowly for 12 to 18 hours. You can also add beeswax to harden the balm when done.

That being done, you will have a mixture that can treat skin conditions such as acne and blisters. You can also rub your temples for headaches or chest pains to relieve nasal congestion and cold symptoms. It even works on sore joints!

Cannabis root tea

Another modern recipe is cannabis root tea. To do this, mix about 20 grams of cannabis root with other herbs, such as anise and cinnamon, and cook for about twelve hours.

But be very careful:

Some cannabis root compounds, such as pyrrolidine and piperidine, are toxic when taken in large quantities. They can irritate the stomach lining and even damage the liver. For this reason, we do not recommend prolonged use of tea with cannabis roots!

So, did you like this information? We strongly believe in the use of cannabis in a medicinal and holistic way – after all, this plant has a lot to offer us. But, if possible, consult a doctor or specialist in herbology before using any herbal medicine! Plants have power and, like any medicine, they may not be suitable for all types of organisms.

What to do with weed stems, stalks, leaves and roots

Many of those that grow their own cannabis seeds treasure the potent buds and simply throw away the rest of the plant. If you have ever wondered what to do with leftover leaves and stems read on for some inspiration.

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How to recycle cannabis plants parts after harvest

Once you have harvested the buds from your cannabis plant you may be left asking yourself what to do with fan leaves and stems etc. Every part of the cannabis plant can be put to good use. Some parts, such as the resin coated leaves, can be used to make some bonus hash, stash or cannabis concentrates.

Grind weed stalks to make mulch for your garden

What to do with weed stems and weed stalks? Do weed stems have THC? Weed stalks don’t usually produce enough THC to get high from. In this respect, marijuana stalks are one of the less valuable leftovers from your home grow. Some strains produce trichomes on the stems but most people would struggle to capture sufficient quantities to consider e.g. hash production worthwhile. Instead, many people simply mulch the weed stalks and stems into compost.

Other ideas on what weed stems can be used for include drying/grinding them for use in baking or tea. Weed tea with stems is a treat for some growers. Can you smoke weed stems? It’s a common question but THC production from weed stems is very low. Using weed stems to make potent edible cannabis products is also not recommended for the same reason.

Make your own tea, juice or hash with fan leaves

Learning how to make weed tea with leaves is one of the more popular ways to reuse cannabis harvest left-overs. You can dry the leaves or use them freshly picked to make tea from. Some use the cannabis leaves as salad leaves, or even juice them, though the strong taste may not be to everyones liking.

Do marijuana leaves have THC? Yes they do. Often you can see trichomes (resin glands) on the fan leaves, though you may notice many more trichomes on the smaller sugar leaves in the buds. One common question from cannabis growers is ‘what to do with marijuana leaves after harvest?’. There are several fan leaf uses other than weed tea. Some learn how to make hash out of weed leaves. Others become expert in how to make weed butter with leaves.

The following links may be useful, including for those who want to know how to make weed butter with stems.

Related:
How to make cannabutter
Understanding and using cannabis leaves
What to do with already vaped weed

Blend sugar leaves in THC butter and other edibles

The uses for marijuana leaves and stems are numerous. Sugar leaves are some of the most useful. Sugar leaves are the smaller leaves that you find in your buds. They are often completely coated with a resinous layer of cannabis trichomes giving them a ‘sugary’ appearance. You can use sugar leaves to make THC butter (cannabutter) or hash (dry sift or ice hash). Or you can simply vape the sugar leaves.

Related:
Hashish. What is hash and how can you make it easily?
What are cannabis trichomes and how do they affect your smoke?

Turn cannabis roots into tea or topicals

Cannabis root tea is one of the more popular cannabis root uses. The roots are usually washed clean, dried and made into a tea. Some people dry and grind the roots to use as part of a skin/topical cream.

Amend used soils with nutrients for future plants

Even the old soil used to grow your cannabis seeds in can be reused. Many old-school growers will recycle their coco fibre or soil. Usually the soil will need amending with fresh minerals and nutrients. This is usually only recommended for experienced professionals that can lab test the soil and adjust it accordingly. Those new to cannabis seed growing are always recommended to start with fresh soil.
Organic growers will claim that organic soil is the most suitable for re-use, especially when used with slow release organic nutrients such as those from BioTabs.

Best yielding indoor and outdoor feminised seeds

Trying to use all parts of the cannabis plant is increasingly popular with those that grow their own cannabis seeds. If you do grow your own weed then you may want to focus your cultivation purely on the best yielding cannabis seeds. The following links and seed recommendations are essential reading for the yield conscious growers.

Related:
The top 5 best yielding indoor cannabis seeds
The best 5 yielding outdoor feminised cannabis seeds
The best 5 yielding autoflower seeds

Growing cannabis with the highest THC levels is the main focus for many home growers as well as commercial growers. If you share that approach, then the next links will be well worth reading. Whatever you grow next, see if you can use the whole of the cannabis plant from your harvest and enjoy the grow!

The Importance of Cannabis Roots: Medical Potential, History, and Current Uses

Most growers give little thought to the roots of cannabis plants beyond ensuring that they’re healthy and supplied with water, nutrients, oxygen and drainage—before discarding them at harvest time. But the roots have been used in folk medicine for millennia, and contain several compounds that may be of medicinal value.

To get to the roots of it, let’s first investigate how these roots have been used in the past:

Use of cannabis roots as medicine through history

Cannabis roots have a long-documented history of being used for medicinal purposes. The oft-cited Chinese herbal Shennong pên Ts’ao ching, dated to around 2700 BCE, mentions that cannabis root was dried and ground to form the basis of a paste used to reduce pain caused by broken bones or surgery.

It was also crushed to extract the fresh juice, or boiled to make a decoction, and in this manner used in many ways, including:

  • As a diuretic
  • As an anti-haemorrhagic to stop post-partum bleeding in childbirth (as well as other forms of bleeding)
  • To ease difficult childbirth
  • To reduce pain and swelling from bruises and scrapes

The Roman historian Pliny the Elder wrote in his Naturalis Historia in around 79 CE that cannabis root could be boiled in water to make a preparation that relieved joint cramps, gout and acute pain. He also stated that the raw root could be applied directly to burns to reduce pain and blistering, but must be changed frequently to prevent drying-out.

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The Roman physician Dioscorides also attested to the use of boiled cannabis root poultices to treat inflammation, gout and ‘twisted sinews’. The Greek medical writer Oribasius wrote that the ‘dry’ root could also be applied to eruptions of the skin such as subcutaneous cysts, when mixed in equal quantities with pigeon droppings—although no other source apparently makes this claim.

The English physician, William Salmon wrote in the early 18th century that hemp root could be mixed with barley flower and applied as a poultice to treat sciatica and hip joint pain. From the late 18th century up to the turn of the 20th century, American physicians would recommend decoctions of hemp root and seeds to treat inflammation, incontinence and venereal disease.

Modern-day use of cannabis roots

Traditional use of cannabis root is known to have persisted up to at least the 1960s in Argentina, where it was used to reduce fever, dysentery, and gastric complaints and to improve overall health and well-being. There’s also a hemp-root tea known as ma cha that is still consumed in Korea, although it’s not exactly clear what its medicinal benefits are supposed to be.

Many modern-day growers, as well as dispensaries and patients in the USA, utilise preparations made from cannabis root to provide subjective relief from a range of ailments. Some home-brew cannabis root ‘tea’, usually by slowly simmering the dried, powdered root (often with cinnamon bark, anise, or other aromatics) in a crock pot for twelve hours or more before straining and drinking.

If it’s put back on to boil after straining, it can also be reduced down to a gummy, tarry extract to form the basis of tinctures or liniments. Others will simmer the root in oil and water, before separating out the residual oil from the water and plant matter and using as the basis for topical medications.

Some even use the root in its dry, powdered form to make dry poultices that can help to soothe and heal burns, cuts and skin complaints such as dermatitis. There’s even one report of dried, powdered root being used to ‘draw out’ the venom from a scorpion sting—this may have some validity, as fresh cannabis juice was apparently used for this purpose in ancient China.

Today, some dispensaries also reportedly stock preparations made from hemp and cannabis root, that can be found in body lotions, salves, lip balms, massage oils and many other products.

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Cannabis in the Czech Republic – Laws, Uses and History

Cannabinoids in the roots

There is evidence to suggest that cannabis roots contain some trace quantity of cannabinoids (particularly CBD), and that the concentration depends on the strain, as well as being affected to some extent by environmental factors. Apparently on this basis, there are now various outlets in the USA selling powdered, ‘activated’ cannabis root ostensibly for its high CBD concentrations. However, it appears that the concentration of CBD in cannabis root is very low, and it’s doubtful that it would have any medical efficacy at such levels.

A Canadian study published in 2012 analysed Finola hemp and found that the flowers contained CBDA (the acidic precursor to CBD) at an approximately 2.4% concentration, while the leaves, stems and roots contained 0.5%, 0.04% and 0.004% respectively. The parts also contained the precursor to CBDA, a substance known as hexanoyl-CoA, in concentrations of 15.5%, 4.0%, 2.2% and 1.5% respectively. Studies into high-THC varieties are apparently not available, but it’s likely that the roots would also exhibit much lower concentrations than the flowers and leaves.

Other substances of medical interest in cannabis roots

Although the roots are primarily composed of sugars and lipids, low levels of terpenes, alkaloids and various other compounds have been isolated. In 1971, it was determined that ethanol extract of hemp roots contained the terpenes friedelin, pentacyclic triterpene ketones, and epifriedelanol.

Friedelin is thought to have hepatoprotective (liver-protecting) and antioxidant effects, epifriedelanol has been demonstrated to have antitumour effects, and several pentacyclic triterpene ketones are thought to cause apoptosis in cancer cells, as well as reduce inflammation, pain and bacterial infection and possess diuretic and immunomodulatory properties.

Several alkaloids that may be of medicinal value have been identified in cannabis roots, as well. The alkaloids piperidine and pyrrolidine have both been found in the roots, as well as in the stems, seeds, pollen and leaves. These alkaloids can be highly toxic in high doses, but in smaller doses have been found to have various medical benefits.

Piperidine is used as a chemical ‘building block’ for various pharmaceuticals, particularly those involved in psychiatric medicine such as paroxetine and haloperidol. Pyrrolidine is also used as a building block for a class of stimulant drugs known as racetams.

The roots of cannabis have also been noted to contain choline and atropine in small quantities. Choline is an essential dietary nutrient that is the precursor to the predominant neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and is thought to be crucial to the maintenance of healthy cell membranes.

It’s thought that postmenopausal women are extremely likely to be deficient in choline, meaning that hemp-root tea consumed orally could provide important benefits. Atropine is well-known as a means to dilate the pupil and relax the eye muscles. It also has bronchodilatory properties, and is used to increase heart rate during medical resuscitation.

Cannabis roots and sex determination

It appears that cannabis roots grow differently according to their gender, and that a complex set of genetic interactions determines them both. A study into hemp varieties in Russia seems to clearly demonstrate this. It showed young cannabis plants would develop into male plants 80-90% of the time if they:

  • Were cut off above the root
  • Were processed as cuttings and kept in an aerated nutrient solution
  • Had all new roots cut off as soon as they appeared

However, if roots were allowed to regenerate then 80-90% would develop as females.

The researchers also treated the de-rooted cuttings with 6-benzylaminopurine, a synthetic cytokinin (plant hormones that facilitate cytokinesis, or cell division) that is known to be involved in cell division and differentiation, as well as overall growth and development. Treated cuttings developed in 80% female plants. This strongly suggests that cytokinin production in the roots plays a strong role in sex determination in cannabis.

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Making sure your roots are healthy

If cultivating with the intention of using the roots, hydroponic and aeroponic techniques are preferable as they allow for a finer degree of precision when administering nutrients, enable the grower to regularly inspect for progress and signs of ill-health, and ensure that the roots will be clean and free from soil.

Plant breeders have developed specialised systems to maximise root health and growth; the best-known technique involves integrated air-pruning of roots to encourage dense growth within a specified volume.

Air-pruning of roots refers to the natural die-off of roots when exposed to low humidity and air. There are many pots and trays designed with perforated sides available, which helps this to occur naturally.

As the roots die off, the plant continually regenerates new roots, and the root ball itself becomes thick and dense. It’s preferable to air-prune rather than allow roots to hit the sides of pots and then continue to grow around the container, as this leads to twisted, strangulated roots that exhibit reduced nutrient uptake. As well as ensuring the good health of the roots themselves, air-pruning also improves the plant’s overall health and eventual yield.

Keeping roots fed with a mister or dripper system is generally advisable. Some growers will switch the pumps on 2-8 times per day (with increasing frequency as the root mass increases in size), allowing the medium to dry out slightly between feeds.

During the vegetative period, which of course is the period which undergoes the most extensive root growth, the roots should be directly supplied with light vegetative-stage nutrient solution and root boosting solution. Ensure that adequate airflow is provided to the outside of the pots or trays, so the roots will be exposed to the maximum fresh air and will dry out rapidly—it’s also a good idea to direct a fan (or multiple fans!) towards the roots to boost airflow.

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What to do with cannabis roots, and how to clean them

Now, with plenty of healthy roots to work with, they should be cleaned before using them for anything. Carefully remove the roots from the soil, keeping as much of it intact as possible. This is best done when the soil is still moist, as dry soil will try to cling to the roots even more.

Gently knock the roots on the ground or the side of the pot to try to let most of the soil fall off. Then cut the roots from the plant stalk (leaving a little wiggle room to work with) and remove any leaves.

Using water, rinse the roots well until (hopefully) no soil at all remains (especially if there are plans to consume them in any way). This may take a while. Don’t use hot water. Room temperature water is best, but if needed, lukewarm water can be used too. A soft toothbrush may help.

How to make your own cannabis root balm

At this point, there several things that can be done with the roots, all with their own benefits. With a little effort and perseverance, and some trial and error, it’s even possible to select a variety of strains to be used alone or in combination, to make balms and salves with a range of potency and potential uses.

Typically, the roots of cannabis are dried prior to being processed into balm. Then, the dried root mass is broken up into small chunks, or ground into powder with a pestle and mortar or a blender.

Once the dried root is broken down into a rough powder, it’s added to a slow cooker along with oil and water and gently heated for up to 12 hours, allowing the volatile compounds (including terpenoids and potentially even cannabinoids) to dissolve in the oil. The addition of water prevents the mixture from drying out and the oil from ‘frying’ the roots; the mixture should be checked every hour or so and fresh water added if necessary.

Once the heating stage is complete, the liquid is strained off and the residual root pulp is separated out and either discarded or frozen (to be processed a second time if deemed necessary). The liquid is placed in a freezer, and after some time the water will freeze while the volatile oils rise to the surface and can be scraped cleanly off. At this temperature, the oils will usually have a semi-solid, waxy consistency. At room temperature though, they will be much more liquid, and should have a smooth, translucent appearance.

Once the oil has been separated from the ice, it can be reheated and beeswax can be added to achieve a less runny, more spreadable consistency at room temperature. Trial and error is the best way to establish the desired consistency.

At this time, aromatic essential oils can be added to the mixture to improve fragrance and possibly even enhance medicinal properties.

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Potential risks of using cannabis roots

While cannabis roots no doubt possess various useful and important medicinal properties, it’s important to note that in high doses it can cause hepatotoxicity, due to the presence of the alkaloids pyrrolidine and piperidine. It’s also reported that the alkaloid content can irritate the stomach lining; thus, oral consumption of hemp-root tea is potentially riskier than topical application.

Pyrrolidine and piperidine can also act as irritants of the skin, mucous membranes and lungs. It’s unlikely that the compounds are present in high enough concentrations to present serious risk, but care should be taken to avoid prolonged or heavy use.

Certainly, hemp root extract should not be consumed in its undiluted, extract form. As a tea, light to moderate long-term usage should not present any serious risk, and as a topical, any reaction should present itself rapidly and use can be discontinued with no known long-term ill effects.

Our knowledge of the properties of cannabis root is still in its infancy, and as the industry continues to develop, it is likely that even more uses for them will be discovered.

Laws and regulations regarding cannabis cultivation differ from country to country. Sensi Seeds therefore strongly advises you to check your local laws and regulations. Do not act in conflict with the law.