Will cbd oil test positive for thc

Legal CBD Products May Make You Test Positive For Cannabis In Urine Drug Tests, Johns Hopkins Study Says

With legal cannabis and hemp hitting the mainstream hard, and expanding rapidly across the U.S. and the rest of the world, the availability of products containing CBD in considerable proportions is exploding.

And, while some studies have suggested drug testing at work is a thing of the past, this is not the case for all jobs. Some jobs, as well as criminal justice and addiction treatment proceedings, among others, still require drug testing.

How We Drug-Test For Cannabis

During a recent conversation, postdoctoral fellow Tory Spindle, Ph.D., a researcher in the Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, explained how we drug-test for cannabis.

“There is a need to understand whether the use of CBD products (. ) can impact drug testing for cannabis given their growing availability and increased interest in CBD for therapeutic purposes.”

“Conventional urine drug testing for cannabis targets a common metabolite of THC called THCCOOH (THC is the primary psychoactive component of cannabis). Importantly, many CBD-dominant products contain low levels of THC, including hemp-derived CBD products which can legally contain up to 0.3% THC,” he said. “There is a need to understand whether the use of CBD products, with and without low levels of THC, can impact drug testing for cannabis given their growing availability and increased interest in CBD for therapeutic purposes.”

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And this is what Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers set out to do in recent months, publishing their findings at the Journal of Analytical Toxicology this week.

Troubling Results

A team at Johns Hopkins Medicine conducted a study in which six individuals administered pure CBD, both orally and using a vaporizer, as well as inhaled vaporized CBD-dominant cannabis (containing 0.39% THC) on separate occasions.

After dosing, they provided urine samples to determine whether they would test positive for cannabis using common drug testing standards.

“The results showed that pure CBD did not produce a positive result on a standard urine drug test for cannabis. However, 2 of 6 participants tested positive for cannabis after they inhaled CBD-dominant cannabis vapor,” Spindle explained.

In his and his colleagues’ opinion, these results have important implications for consumers of CBD products.

“2 of 6 participants tested positive for cannabis after they inhaled CBD-dominant cannabis vapor.”

“The cannabis used in this study was very similar in THC composition to what is found in legal CBD/hemp products,” Spindle continued. “Individuals who are subject to urine drug testing in their place of employment or elsewhere should understand that even very small amounts of THC in a CBD/hemp product can trigger a positive result for cannabis and that conventional drug tests cannot distinguish whether THC present in someone’s system came from cannabis, or a federally-legal hemp product.

“These results are especially important for people who use hemp/CBD products daily, such as for therapeutic reasons, because THC can potentially build up in a person’s system with repeated use, which could further increase the chances of a positive result for cannabis.”

Finally, Spindle pointed out the findings of the Johns Hopkins study are highlight the issue of some poorly regulated CBD products being advertised as “THC free,” even though they were found to contain levels of THC similar to (or higher) than the THC levels present in the cannabis used in a study conducted by Ryan Vandrey, Ph.D., associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

“THC can potentially build up in a person’s system with repeated use [of CBD products], which could further increase the chances of a positive result for cannabis.”

Vandrey and his collaborators at the University of Pennsylvania had published a JAMA study showing that that 21% of CBD/hemp products sold on the Internet contained THC, even though their labels didn’t properly disclose it.

“I have a hard time finding anyone who hasn’t used a CBD product at least once, but most are completely unaware of the possibility of THC exposure or a positive drug test as a result of using these newly legalized products,” Vandrey said in a release.

Will CBD Show Up On a Drug Test?

CBD (cannabidiol) oil is a popular supplement for symptoms like anxiety, pain control, and sleeping difficulties. While CBD alone doesn’t show up on a drug test, with the rise of CBD products comes the concern about testing positive for another cannabinoid — tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) when using CBD oil.

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THC is the main psychoactive ingredient in cannabis plants — and the primary compound drug tests are designed to detect.

Even though hemp-derived oil is said to be THC-free, new stories are emerging among corporate employees, sports players, public service officers, and others who have gotten positive drug test results for the presence of THC after using hemp oils.

So, does CBD show up on a drug test? What should CBD users be aware of before taking a drug screening at work, and what can they do to prevent a THC-positive result?

Continue reading this article to find out.

Does CBD Show Up On a Drug Test?

Drug tests are usually designed to detect the presence of THC, or its metabolite THC COOH, to be precise. There’s no point in testing anyone for CBD because this compound doesn’t have intoxicating properties or impact psychomotor functions — however, in theory, drug tests could be designed to test for the presence of CBD and its metabolites.

Long story short, CBD doesn’t show up on a drug test. However, there’s a chance you may get a false-positive result for THC if you’re using hemp oils with trace amounts of THC.

Does CBD Oil Contain THC?

Depending on the source of the cannabis used to extract the CBD oil, some products do contain at least some THC.

Cannabis is the umbrella term describing hemp and marijuana.

Marijuana plants are characterized by the presence of THC — so even when the oil is extracted from a CBD-rich strain, it may still contain detectable levels of THC.

Hemp is a plant that comes with higher concentrations of CBD and only trace amounts of THC (usually below 0.3%). This isn’t enough to get a person high — the reason why hemp products are federally legal — but can it result in a THC-positive test result?

As it turns out, the source of CBD isn’t the only factor. Harvesting and refinement methods can also change the chemical makeup of your CBD oil.

CBD extracts are typically broken down in the following categories:

1. Full-Spectrum CBD

Full-spectrum CBD products contain all of the compounds that are naturally found in the hemp plant.

In short, a full-spectrum extract carries CBD alongside terpenes, flavonoids, and other cannabinoids — including THC.

For hemp-derived CBD oil, the legal limit for THC content is less than 0.3%.

Not every manufacturer discloses the information about the source of their full-spectrum extracts, so it may be difficult to tell just how much THC may appear in a given product.

That’s why third-party lab testing is important. A lab-tested product should bear a certificate of analysis that lists the entire cannabinoid content along with other compounds present in the extract.

Full-spectrum CBD oils are the most likely to result in a positive finding on a drug test looking for THC.

2. Broad-spectrum CBD

Similar to full-spectrum CBD products, broad-spectrum products contain additional compounds from the hemp plant, including other cannabinoids and terpenes.

However, in broad-spectrum CBD, all of the THC is removed.

This makes broad-spectrum products less likely to trigger a positive test result for THC.

3. CBD Isolate

As the name suggests, CBD isolate contains nothing but pure CBD. It doesn’t have any additional compounds from the source plant.

A lab-tested CBD isolate shouldn’t contain any THC and thus isn’t capable of resulting in a positive drug test.

Due to being odorless and flavorless, the isolate is more versatile than full-spectrum products — you can take it as is or add it to foods and drinks. CBD isolate is also available as oils, tinctures, edibles, and vapes.

Reasons Why CBD Oil Users May Test Positive for THC

Using CBD oil from a trusted source rarely results in a positive drug test. However, there are certain cases where a CBD product will make you fail a drug test. Here’s how it may happen:

1. Some Hemp Oils Contain Trace Amounts of THC

This is the number one reason for a failed drug test.

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If your CBD oil makes THC show up on a drug test, this may be because you bought a product that isn’t actually sourced from hemp or contains more than 0.3 % THC.

Most manufacturers will claim their products don’t contain THC — or it’s below 0.3% — but this isn’t always the case.

2. Cross Contamination

Very small amounts of THC occurring in the sourcing material can get into CBD oil in concentrations high enough to result in a positive drug test. This is more likely to occur with cheaper extraction methods.

3. Mislabelled Products

CBD oil obtained from hemp shouldn’t have more than 0.3% THC. However, it’s quite common for retailers to mislabel their products as THC-free when in fact, it’s a product whose THC content exceeds the legal limit.

Interestingly, one study found that almost 70% of the CBD products sold online were mislabelled, causing potential serious danger to its consumers. The reason for this common phenomenon is that CBD products aren’t regulated by the FDA.

4. Secondhand Exposure to THC

Unintended exposure to marijuana through secondhand smoke shouldn’t be enough for a person to test positive for THC, but it’s still possible. If there’s a drug test in your workplace coming soon, you should avoid spending time in a room with heavy smokers.

How to Use CBD and Avoid a Positive Drug Test

If you take CBD oil, you can take certain measures to try to prevent failing a drug test.

First things first, do in-depth research to make sure that your CBD product is sourced from hemp and that the company uses proper refining methods to filter the THC out of the extract.

The best way to verify the credibility of your manufacturer is to check whether they provide third-party testing reports to prove what’s stated on the label. This way, you know exactly how much CBD, THC, and other cannabinoids are in the product you choose.

If possible, ask the customer service about extraction techniques and the possibility of cross-contamination. Most trusted companies use CO2 extraction to produce their CBD oils, which is a solventless technique that yields clean and potent products.

The best way to ensure there isn’t any THC in your system on the day of a drug test is to take laboratory-tested CBD isolate. This type of CBD is free of any additional compounds from hemp, including THC.

Speaking of which, I’d like you to take a look at my personal recommendations for hemp-derived CBD isolate.

My Favorite CBD Isolate Brands and Products

As a nurse, I’m subject to periodical drug tests. I love the way CBD improves my quality of life — but I also love my job and I find it difficult to imagine losing it due to not paying attention to what I’m buying.

As you may guess, I rarely have the time for measurements, so CBD oil isn’t the best option for me, especially considering that the majority of CBD oils on the market are full-spectrum.

This is where CBD gummies help me out. I take one gummy before, during, and after work to keep myself calm in demanding situations, or when I’m tense and tired after the whole day.

I did my research on isolate-based CBD gummies and came across Royal CBD, a relatively new premium brand that offers CBD in every traditional format. A few months ago, the company added CBD gummies to its product lineup.

These gummy bears contain pure CBD isolate sourced from locally-grown organic hemp plants. Each gummy contains a convenient dose of 10 mg CBD. This potency perfectly fits into my daily routine because I can divide my daily dosage into 3 servings.

Not to mention that now I have a legit excuse for my sweet tooth.

The gummies have a very nice flavor. They actually taste like those candies I remember from childhood. They aren’t full-spectrum, so there’s no herbal aftertaste on the tongue — just a palate-pleasing fruity punch.

Of course, there’s a price to pay (literally) for the quality of the ingredients. Royal CBD gummies are slightly more expensive than what you can find in many online stores, but if you want a lab-tested product that comes from an organic source, I can honestly recommend it.

Can CBD Oil Make You Fail a Drug Test? It Depends…

CBD doesn’t show up on a drug test, and getting a false positive from CBD oil should be impossible so long as it contains less than 0.3% THC.

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However, because the entire industry is very loosely regulated, there’s no guarantee that a CBD product you purchase doesn’t contain THC, or that the CBD concentration is at a safe or effective level.

When buying CBD products online, always do your research. Look for third-party lab reports to ensure the purity of your product, especially if you need to take a drug screening soon.

If you want to play on the safe side, choose CBD to isolate instead of full-spectrum extracts. A properly manufactured isolate is free of any THC and often carries higher doses per serving. Isolate products are also less expensive than their full-spectrum counterparts.

Have you ever tested false-positive on a drug test from using CBD oil?

Livvy Ashton

Livvy is a registered nurse (RN) and board-certified nurse midwife (CNM) in the state of New Jersey. After giving birth to her newborn daughter, Livvy stepped down from her full-time position at the Children’s Hospital of New Jersey. This gave her the opportunity to spend more time writing articles on all topics related to pregnancy and prenatal care.

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Why using CBD might make you fail a drug test

Drug tests don’t screen for CBD, but that doesn’t mean you’re in the clear.

Danielle Kosecki is an award-winning journalist who has covered health and fitness for 15 years. She’s written for Glamour, More, Prevention and Bicycling magazines, among others, and is the editor of The Bicycling Big Book of Training. A New York native, Danielle now lives in Oakland where she doesn’t miss winter at all.

You nailed your cover letter and rocked the interview. All that’s standing between you and an awesome new job is a mandatory drug screening. Will that CBD oil you’ve been taking for pain relief cause you to fail the test?

This story discusses substances that are legal in some places but not in others and is for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You shouldn’t do things that are illegal — this story does not endorse or encourage illegal drug use.

How cannabis drug tests work

When it comes to marijuana, drug tests typically only screen for THC — the compound in cannabis that gets you “high” — or one of the compounds created when your body metabolizes it. And by law CBD products can only contain up to 0.3% THC.

Different types of drug tests have different detection thresholds, but the type you’re most likely to encounter is the “pee test.” To pass a urine drug test, the amount of THC in your body must be below 50 ng/mL. That’s the cutoff recommended federally by the National Institutes of Health and clinically by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, which helps set industry standards for lab certifications.

To hit 50 ng/mL of THC, you’d probably have to consume upwards of 2,000 mg of CBD products that contain 0.3% or less of THC, which is much higher than the average person is likely to take. Even in clinical trials and research studies, people are usually only administered 100-800mg/day.

So you’re in the clear, right? Not quite. There are two ways you could hit that 50 ng/mL mark.

Why CBD might cause you to fail a drug test

First, THC is fat-soluble, so when you ingest it — especially via edibles or a drop of oil under the tongue — it’s absorbed along with other fats and can be stored in your body’s fatty tissue.

Depending on how much CBD (and thus THC), you consume, how often you consume it, your body weight and your diet, it’s possible for THC to accumulate in your body in as little as four to six days and trigger a positive drug test. Research has found that THC can be detectable in your system for up to 30 days, but it’s usually only present in heavy cannabis users after the first week.